FALL 2001 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

September | October | November | December


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas


Enrique de la Garza
"New Directions for Union Organizing in Mexico"

Enrique de la Garza, CLAS Visiting Scholar for the 2001-02 academic year, is a professor of Sociology from the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana (Iztapalapa). He is the author of Cambio en las Relaciones Laborales (1999) and Tratado Latinamericano de Sociologia del Trabajo (2000).

Friday, September 28, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Alan Knight
"The U.S. and Latin America: Does Culture Really Matter?"

Alan Knight is a professor of History and Director of the Centre for Latin American Studies at Oxford University. He is a scholar of modern history and politics in Latin America, especially Mexico. His research interests include revolutions, state-building and peasant movements, and British-U.S. relations with Latin America.

Tuesday, October 2, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Hector Villarroel
Art Opening - "Crossing"

Chilean artist Héctor Villarroel exhibits his most recent works, paintings from a series entitled 'Crossing'.

"Nomadism is central to Villarroel's process of constructing the body of his work; each brush stroke speaking to his many crossings and each one far from the mainstream, transformed into an act of survival and an expression of a political voice." --Soledad Novoa, Art Historian.

August 23 - December 20, 2001
Gallery hours: Monday - Friday, 9 a.m.-12:00 p.m., 1:00-4:00 p.m.

Join us for the artist's talk, followed by a reception:

Wednesday, October 3, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Opening - Photos and Artist's Statement


Panel Discussion
"Historical Perspectives on Contemporary Mexico"

Panelists include:
- Professor Adolfo Gilly (UNAM) [Speech]
- Professor Alicia Hernandez Chavez (Colegio de Mexico) [Speech]
- Professor Alan Knight (Oxford University) [Speech]

Moderated by Professor Margaret Chowning, Deptartment of History, UC Berkeley

Thursday, October 4, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Adolfo Perez Esquivel, 1980 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate
"A Global View of Human Rights"

Adolfo Perez Esquivel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1980. Though an architect and sculptor by trade, Mr. Perez Esquivel has spent the last 27 years promoting peace and human rights in Latin America and around the world. Throughout the body of his work, he insists that this struggle must be waged through non-violent action. To this end, he co-founded Servicio Paz y Justicia, an organization that promotes awareness and solidarity as a means of challenging the multiple violences that characterize society. In his own words, he strives "to be a voice for those who have no voice."

Moderated by Professor Francine Masiello, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, UC Berkeley

(In Spanish with translation)

Co-sponsored with Human Rights Center, International Human Rights Law Clinic of the Boalt Hall School of Law, and the Department of African American Studies

Wednesday, October 10, 4:00 p.m.
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall (map)

Analysis and commentary for this event



Series
Brazil: Culture, Society and Politics

Panel Discussion
"Writing the Amazon: A Conversation on Contemporary Literature by Amazonians"

- Márcio Souza, Amazonian writer and President of FUNARTE
- Professor Nicomedes Suarez Araúz, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Smith College
- Professor Lúcia de Sá, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Stanford University

Moderated by Professor Candace Slater, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, UC Berkeley

Monday, October 15, 3:00-5:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall (map)

Cosponsored by the Townsend Center for the Humanities

Analysis and commentary for this event


"Binational Forum on Migrant Health: Tenemos Historia... Hacemos Futuro"

The Binational Forum will convene top health researchers from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border to assess the current status of research on migrant health issues. Twenty scholars from each country have been invited to present before an interdisciplinary audience of policymakers, academics, and health practitioners. The goal of the Binational Forum is to stimulate collaboration on migrant health studies and to strategize on new health research lines to fill in gaps in migrant health research.
This event is part of a series of bilateral activities conducted in coordination with Mexican and California institutions as part of the Binational Health Week.

Please note the event is by invitation only.
For more information, please contact Jaime Garcia at (510) 643-3140 or Ruth Patiño Martinez at (510) 642-6903.

Cosponsored by the California-Mexico Health Initiative (CMHI)

Thursday- Friday, October 18-19, 2001

Analysis and commentary for this event


Series
Brazil: Culture, Society and Politics

Alcida Ramos
"Old Ethics Die Hard: The Yanomami and Scientific Writing"

Alcida Ramos is Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Brasilia and author of Indigenism: Ethnic Politics in Brazil (1998), Yanomami Ethnography in Times of Crisis (1995), and Indian Rights and Indian Policy in Brazil Today (1979).

Respondents:
- Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley
- Candace Slater, Department Spanish and Portuguese, UC Berkeley

Co-sponsored by the Townsend Center for the Humanities

Monday, October 22, 3:00 p.m.
220 Stephens Hall

Photo of the event


Sam Quinones
"Telethons, Talk Shows, and Dead Dinosaurs: The Unnoticed Moments of Mexico's Transition to Democracy"

Sam Quinones is a writer and journalist based in Mexico City.

Cosponsored by the Graduate School of Journalism

Wednesday, October 31, 12:00-2:00 p.m.
Library at the Graduate School of Journalism, North Gate Hall

Analysis and commentary for this event


Series
The U.S. and Mexico:
Redefining the Relationship

Denise Dresser
"Mexico: From PRI Predominance to Divided Democracy"

Denise Dresser is Visiting Fellow at the Pacific Council on International Policy at the University of Southern California, on leave from her post as professor of political science at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM). She has written extensively on Mexican affairs and U.S.-Mexico relations for the editorial page of The Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, and La Opinión. Dr. Dresser received her Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Wednesday, November 7, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Paper by Denise Dresser
Analysis and commentary for this event


Series
The U.S. and Mexico:
Redefining the Relationship

Adolfo Aguilar Zinser
"Security in the Americas: A New Era"

Adolfo Aguilar Zinser is National Security Advisor and Commissioner of Law and Order to Mexico's President, Vicente Fox.

Friday, November 16, 4:00 p.m.
141 McCone Hall (map)

Photos of the event


Alex Saragoza
"1910 Mexican Revolution"
Alex Saragoza is a UC Berkeley professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies. He will deliver a lecture on the Mexican Revolution in celebration of November 20, 1910, the Day of the Mexican Revolution. Accompanying will be a reception and an exhibit of historical documentation.

Cosponsored with the Consulate General of Mexico, Instituto Mexicano de Cultura, and the Bancroft Library

Monday, November 19, 7:00-8:30 p.m.
Heller Reading Room, the Bancroft Library
(Adjacent to the Doe Memorial Library opposite the Clock Tower)

Photos of the event


Series
The U.S. and Mexico:
Redefining the Relationship

Ambassador Andrés Rozental
"U.S.-Mexico Relations: A Post-September 11 Scenario"

Andrés Rozental is Ambassador at Large and Special Presidential Envoy for President Vicente Fox. He is former Deputy Foreign Minister of Mexico (1988-1994), and Ambassador to Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United Nations in Geneva.

Tuesday, November 27, 4:00 p.m.
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall (map)

Analysis and commentary for this event


Series
Brazil: Culture, Society and Politics

Maria Filomena Gregori
"Street Children and Circulation: A Case Study in São Paulo, Brazil"

CLAS visiting scholar María Gregori is a professor of anthropology at the University of Campinas, Brazil. Her past research has focused on violence against women, street children, citizenship, and social policy. While at Berkeley, she will be focusing on her current research project--articulating subjects as new forms of erotism and gender violence.

Thursday, November 29, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Film Presentation
"Like Water for Chocolate"

Free and open to the public.

Cosponsored by Chaitanya, the Berkeley International Development Group

Thursday, November 29, 8:00 p.m.
William Nestrick Room, 141 Dwinelle


Panel Discussion
"From Sweatshop Labor to Worker Power"

Participants include:

- Marcela Munoz Tepepa, Kukdong worker and the founding General Secretary of the Independent Union of Mexmode Workers.
- Ivan De Erick Diaz Xolo, Kukdong worker and another leader in the reform effort at Kukdong.
- Catalina Guzman Albafull, Research Assistant in Economics at the Autonomous University of Puebla.
- Scott Nova, Executive Director of the Worker Rights Consortium.
- Katie Quan, Director of the Henning Center for International Labor Relations, UC Berkeley.

Cosponsored with:
- UC Berkeley Henning Center for International Labor Relations
- UC Berkeley Peace and Conflict Studies Program
- UC Berkeley Human Rights Center
- San Francisco Labor Council for Latin American Advancement
- Global Exchange
- Sweatshop Watch
- Students Organizing for Justice in the Americas
- Farm Worker Support Committee
- Student Labor Action Coalition

Wednesday, December 5, 7:00 p.m.
Director's Lounge, Institute for Industrial Relations, 2521 Channing Way

Analysis and commentary for this event

 

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