SPRING 2013 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Oscar Oszlak
“Why Are Some Citizens More Democratic Than Others? Lessons From the Argentine Experience”

Oscar Oszlak’s latest research looks at variation in how citizens rate the quality of democracy and explores possible explanations for these differences. Factors that may influence citizen’s opinion of democracy include age, income level, education, and local economic conditions.

Oscar Oszlak is a professor at the Universidad de Buenos Aires, the Facultad Latinoamericana de Ciencias Sociales, the Universidad Nacional de San Martín, and the Universidad de San Andrés. He is also the founder and former director of the Centro de Estudios de Estado y Sociedad (CEDES), a consultant for the World Bank, and the author of many books and academic articles.

Thursday, January 31, 4:00 pm
223 Moses Hall

Video and photos of the event


Panel Discussion
China and Latin America: Perceptions, Problems, and Opportunities

While China’s relations with Latin America once focused on revolutionary movements and social justice, today they revolve around markets and materials. This change has brought both increased tensions and new relationships. This panel explores the changing role of China in Latin America and the economic factors that drive relations, cultural overtures, and opportunities for the future.

Panel Discussants:
Carol Wise, Associate Professor of International Relations, University of Southern California
Julia Strauss, Senior Lecturer in Chinese Politics, School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London
Barry Eichengreen, Professor of Economics and Political Science, UC Berkeley
Margaret Myers, Director, China and Latin America Program, Inter-America Dialogue

Moderator: Harley Shaiken, Professor of Education and Geography; Chair, Center for Latin American Studies, UC Berkeley

Co-sponsored with the Institute of East Asian Studies and the Center for Chinese Studies

More information

Tuesday, February 12, 4:00 pm
Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room
2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor

Video and photos of the event


Isaac Lee
Journalism in the Americas: A Conversation with Lowell Bergman

Isaac Lee is president of News for Univision Communications Inc., the leading media company serving Hispanic America. He has spent the past 14 years in editorial roles leading top journalistic teams at prominent publications serving Spanish-speaking audiences in the U.S. and Latin America.

Video of Isaac Lee with ABC News' Ben Sherwood

Wednesday, February 13, 6:00 pm
North Gate Hall Library

Video and photos of the event


BALA Spring 2013, Fog at the Golden Gate, by Toby Harriman.

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Nancy Scheper-Hughes
“The Revolution in Maternal Thinking and Child Survival in Northeast Brazil:
20 Years After Death Without Weeping

A mother-to-be in Brazil.
An expectant mother in Brazil.
(Photo courtesy of Nancy Scheper-Hughes..)

In this public lecture, Prof. Scheper-Hughes will discuss life and death in the interior of Northeast Brazil, 20 years after the publication of Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil. Her controversial discussion of mother love and child death is one of her most well-known — though least well-understood — theses.  She will clarify her argument and explain how a veritable sexual and reproductive  revolution came about in the first decade of the 21st century.

Nancy Scheper-Hughes is Chancellor’s Professor of Anthropology at UC Berkeley, where she directs the doctoral program in Medical Anthropology, and the co-founder and director of Organs Watch, a medical human rights project on human trafficking to supply organs for transplant patients. A new, updated edition of her landmark 1993 ethnography Death Without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil is in preparation. 

Monday, February 25, 1:00 pm
554 Barrows Hall


Video and photos of the event


Kenneth M. Roberts
Market Reform and Party System Stability in Latin America

Mexican ballot boxes.
Ballot boxes in Mexico.
(Photo by oneworld.nl.)

While countries across Latin America adopted significant market reforms in the 1980s and 90s, the political effects varied widely depending on the political orientation of the government in power. “Bait-and-switch” reforms adopted by populist or leftist leaders created a legacy of electoral volatility that included the demise of historic conservative parties and the outflanking of traditional populist parties by more radical outsiders. By contrast, market reforms that were adopted by conservative leaders and opposed by a major leftist rival reinforced party systems and led to stable patterns of electoral competition.

Kenneth Roberts is a professor of Government at Cornell University, with a specialization in the political economy of Latin America. He is the author and editor of several books, including The Resurgence of the Latin American Left (Johns Hopkins University Press 2011).

- Forthcoming article from Roberts in Comparative Politics

Thursday, February 28, 4:00 pm
554 Barrows Hall

Video and photos of the event


Photo from Elite Squad: The Enemy Within

Series:
Cine Latino

La Yuma
Directed by Florence Jaugey (Nicaragua, 2009)

Image from La Yuma.
(Image from La Yuma.)

Nicaragua’s first full-length feature film in more than 20 years tells the story of Yuma, a tough girl who dreams of escaping poverty by becoming a boxer. In the ring, she finds release for the pent-up aggression and anger from life in the slums of Managua, a loveless family life, and friends who waste their lives on petty crime. 91 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

“La Yuma” won the Audience Award at the San Francisco Film Festival, and numerous honors at festivals throughout Latin America, Europe and the US. 

Wednesday, March 6, 7:00 pm
Room 2060, Valley Life Sciences Building


BALA Spring 2013, Fog at the Golden Gate, by Toby Harriman.

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Paul Wise
Health and Justice in Indigenous Guatemala

Woman speaking to Brazilian rural women's group. Photo courtesy of Jeff Rubin.
A nurse in Guatemala.
(Photo from World Bank Photo Collection.)

What is the relationship between health services and justice in settings of political instability and poor governance? How do persistent tensions between the health, social science, and human rights communities play out when assessing the role of technical interventions, such as medical care, to address health problems clearly generated by profound poverty and social oppression? Prof. Wise will describe the experience of community-driven health programs in indigenous areas of highland Guatemala as a basis for discussing an integrated strategy that respects both medical capacity and the social determinants of health.

Paul Wise is the Richard E. Behrman Professor of Child Health and Society and a professor of Pediatrics at Stanford University’s School of Medicine. He is also a senior fellow at the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University.

Monday, March 11, 5:00 pm
554 Barrows Hall

Video and photos of the event


Jeffrey W. Rubin and Emma Sokoloff-Rubin
Sustaining Activism: A Brazilian Women’s Movement

Woman speaking to Brazilian rural women's group. Photo courtesy of Jeff Rubin.
Woman addressing a gathering of 20,000 rural Brazilian women. (Photo courtesy of Jeff Rubin.)

In 1986, a group of young Brazilian women started a movement to secure economic rights for rural women and to transform women’s roles in their homes and communities. Together with activists across the country, they built a new democracy in the wake of a military dictatorship. Jeffrey W. Rubin and Emma Sokoloff-Rubin, a father-daughter team, describe the challenges of ethnographic research and the way their collaboration gave them a unique window into a fiery struggle for equality.

Jeffrey W. Rubin is an associate professor of History and a research associate at the Institute on Culture, Religion, and World Affairs at Boston University.

Emma Sokoloff-Rubin is a reporter for Gotham Schools and has written extensively on Latin America for a variety of publications.

Tuesday, March 12, 4:00 pm
370 Dwinelle Hall

Video and photos of the event


Symposium
Spiraling Time: Intermedial Conversations in Latin American Arts

Artists, scholars, and curators will converge at this symposium hosted by the UC Berkeley Arts Research Center in order to investigate “time-based” art practices in a Latin American context. Panels will address questions of history, memory, and temporality in a series of interactive conversations between participants and audience members. The event will be punctuated by three keynote addresses from the perspectives of art history and performance studies.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund, and the Departments of History of Art and Spanish & Portuguese at UC Berkeley.

For more information, see http://arts.berkeley.edu/events/spiralingtime.html

Friday, March 15, 1:00 - 5:00 pm
Saturday March 16, 9:00 - 5:00 pm
Museum Theater, UC Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, 2621 Durant Avenue

Article about the event


BALA Spring 2013, Fog at the Golden Gate, by Toby Harriman.

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Alison Post
“Decentralizing and Corporatizing Water and Sanitation in Developing Countries”

Water supply in Panama.
The water supply in Cocle, Panama.
(Photo by World Bank Photo Collection.)

Over the last 20 years, international financial institutions and academics have advocated for two types of reforms for urban water and sanitation systems: decentralization and institutional reforms designed to insulate service providers from interference by elected officials. This presentation documents their adoption in the developing world and analyzes experiences to date with both reform initiatives.

Alison Post is an assistant professor of Political Science and Global Metropolitan Studies at UC Berkeley. Her research focuses on the political economy of development, the politics of public policy, and subnational politics in Latin America. 

Monday, March 18, 12:00 - 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Video and photos of the event


Sergio Fajardo
Education: The Road to a New Colombia

Sergio Fajardo in 2012.
Sergio Fajardo during Colombia's 2012 campaign.
(Photo by Laura Rico Piñeres.)

Sergio Fajardo was elected governor of Antioquia (economically the most important province of Colombia) in 2011. As Mayor of Medellín (2003-2007), he received international recognition for his innovative and effective policies on education, violence reduction, and inequality.

POSTPONED



Photo Exhibit
Nicaragua: Surviving the Legacy of U.S. Policy

René, 1986, age 18. Photo by Paul Dix.
René, 1986, age 18. Aldo Chavarría Hospital,
Managua, Nicaragua. (Photo by Paul Dix.)

From 1985 until 1990, Paul Dix used his camera to document the effects of the U.S.-funded Contra War on Nicaragua’s poor. In 2002, Dix and Pamela Fitzpatrick followed up with roughly 100 of the thousands of Nicaraguans he had photographed, sharing the earlier photos with family members, taking new photographs, and recording testimonies.

CLAS will have a selection of photos from this collection on display starting April 1. The Center will also be hosting a reception with Paul Dix and Pamela Fitzpatrick on April 15.

Exhibit:
April 1 – June 1
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Please, call in advance if you would like to stop by: 510-642-2088.


Tinker Summer Field Research Symposium

This symposium is a unique opportunity to learn about the current research done by UC Berkeley graduate students who spent last summer in Latin America. Field research grants were provided by CLAS with the generous support of the Tinker Foundation.

Online summer research reports

Schedule of presentations

Tuesday, April 2, 3:00 - 4:00 pm; Wednesday, April 3, 3:00 - 5:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Photo from Elite Squad: The Enemy Within

Series:
Cine Latino

La Demora
Directed by Rodrigo Pla (Uruguay, 2012)

Image from La Demora.
(Image from La Demora.)

Based on the novel by Laura Santullo, “La Demora” is a nuanced portrayal of the distress that takes hold of a single mother faltering under the weight of her burdens. Middle-aged Maria lives with her three children and her Alzheimer’s-afflicted father in their cramped Montevideo apartment. As she juggles her various responsibilities, the stress of trying to stretch her tiny paycheck to cover a family of five takes its toll. She grows increasingly impatient with her father, whose needs are becoming all-consuming, and in a moment of panic, she commits an impulsive act — with unanticipated consequences. 84 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

“…Pla and his collaborators have crafted a pungently textured environment in which we’re deeply immersed.” — Neil Young, The Hollywood Reporter

Wednesday, April 3, 7:00 pm
2060 Valley Life Sciences Building


Javier Corrales
¿Más Duro, Maduro?  The Future of Radical Populism in Venezuela

Maduro declares his candidacy for president in Venezuela.
Nicolás Maduro declares his candidacy for president of Venezuela, 2013.
(Photo by chavezcandanga.)

On the eve of the first presidential election since the passing of Hugo Chávez, scheduled for April 14, this talk will discuss how interim president Nicolás Maduro has confronted the economic challenges left behind by Chávez and the implications for Latin America of a post-Chávez Venezuela.

Javier Corrales is a professor of Political Science at Amherst College and the co-author of U.S.-Venezuela Relations: Coping with Midlevel Security Threats.

Video interviews with Corrales on Venezuela after Chávez in English and Spanish

Other interviews from Corrales on Venezuela

Wednesday, April 10, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club

Video and photos of the event


The Thinker outside Buenos Aires' Congress building. Photo by David Berkowitz.
The Thinker outside Buenos Aires' Congress building. (Photo by David Berkowitz.)
Daniel Santoro
Impunity, Corruption, and Politics in Argentina: From Menem to Boudou

Argentine corruption is not simply a failure of Menemism or Kirchnerism. It is a structural problem, and judicial impunity lies at its root. While 750 corruption lawsuits have been filed since the return of democracy in 1983, only three officials have been convicted.

Daniel Santoro is an award-winning editor at Clarín, Argentina’s largest newspaper. He has conducted extensive investigations into government corruption, national security, and international drug trafficking.

Friday, April 12, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Video, photos and article about the event


Photo Exhibit
Nicaragua: Surviving the Legacy of U.S. Policy

Wilfredo, 1986, age 10. Photo by Paul Dix.

Wilfredo, 1986, age 10 at the burial of his mother and brother, La Esperanza, Nueva Guinea,
Nicaragua. (Photo by Paul Dix.)

From 1985 until 1990, Paul Dix used his camera to document the effects of the U.S.-funded Contra War on Nicaragua’s poor. In 2002, Dix and Pamela Fitzpatrick followed up with roughly 100 of the thousands of Nicaraguans he had photographed, sharing the earlier photos with family members, taking new photographs, and recording testimonies.

CLAS will have a selection of photos from this collection on display starting April 1. The Center will also be hosting a reception with Paul Dix and Pamela Fitzpatrick on April 15.

Exhibit:
April 1 – June 1
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch St.

Please, call in advance if you would like to stop by: 510-642-2088

Reception:
Monday, April 15, 5:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Getulio Vargas appears in Brazilian propaganda.
Getulio Vargas in Brazilian propaganda from the Estado Novo (New State) period.

Wendy Hunter
From Getúlio to Lula: Shifting Orientations in Brazilian Social Policy

The evolution of the welfare state has redefined citizenship in Brazil. By comparing the social insurance and assistance schemes instituted under President Getúlio Vargas (1930-45) to those of recent Workers’ Party presidents (2003-present), Wendy Hunter will analyze the causes, consequences, and challenges of expanding the welfare state and extending citizenship to more Brazilians.

Wendy Hunter is a professor of Government at the University of Texas at Austin. Her books include The Transformation of the Workers’ Party in Brazil and Eroding Military Influence in Brazil.

Tuesday, April 16, 4:00 pm
202 Barrows Hall

Video and photos of the event


Photo from Elite Squad: The Enemy Within

Series:
Cine Latino

Hermano
Directed by Marcel Rasquin (Venezuela, 2010)

Image from Hermano.
(Image from Hermano.)

Venezuela’s submission to the 2011 Academy Awards chronicles the lives of two boys whose talent on the soccer field may be their only chance to escape their lives of poverty in Caracas.  Raised as brothers, Julio and Daniel/”Gato” have been virtually inseparable ever since the newborn Daniel was found abandoned in a  trash heap in their La Ceniza slum. The opportunity of their lives arrives when a football scout invites them to try out for the city's top professional team, just as a tragic act of violence threatens to tear them apart. 97 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

The sports-as-savior theme is an old one, but this confident movie, alternately volatile and tender, coats its clichés in winningly natural performances and Enrique Aular's kinetic photography.”   – Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times

Wednesday, April 17, 7:00 pm
Room 105, Northgate Hall


Ian Gordon
Inside Major League Baseball's Dominican Sweatshop System

Dominican boy with a baseball card. Photo by Adam Jones Ph.D.
Dominican boy with a baseball card.
(Photo by Adam Jones Ph.D..)

Two years ago, 18-year-old Yewri Guillén died while training at the Washington Nationals' academy in the Dominican Republic. Team officials called it “tragic.” Major League Baseball insisted conditions had improved at Dominican facilities. So how did Guillén die? Ian Gordon traveled to the DR to uncover what happened — and to examine MLB’s troubling record in this storied baseball hotbed.

Ian Gordon, a UC Berkeley alum, is an editor and reporter at Mother Jones. His work on Latin America has appeared in ESPN the Magazine, Slate, and VanityFair.com.

Tuesday, April 23, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2234 Bowditch Street

Video and photos of the event


Photo from Elite Squad: The Enemy Within

Series:
Cine Latino

Hermano
Directed by Marcel Rasquin (Venezuela, 2010)

Due to technical difficulties at the first scheduled screening of Hermano, we've scheduled a second screening on Wednesday, April 24.

Image from Hermano.
(Image from Hermano.)

Venezuela’s submission to the 2011 Academy Awards chronicles the lives of two boys whose talent on the soccer field may be their only chance to escape their lives of poverty in Caracas.  Raised as brothers, Julio and Daniel/”Gato” have been virtually inseparable ever since the newborn Daniel was found abandoned in a  trash heap in their La Ceniza slum. The opportunity of their lives arrives when a football scout invites them to try out for the city's top professional team, just as a tragic act of violence threatens to tear them apart. 97 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

The sports-as-savior theme is an old one, but this confident movie, alternately volatile and tender, coats its clichés in winningly natural performances and Enrique Aular's kinetic photography.”   – Jeannette Catsoulis, New York Times

Wednesday, April 24, 7:00 pm
Room 2040, Valley Life Sciences Building


Isabel Allende
Maya’s Notebook

Photo by Carles Cerulla.
(Photo by Carles Cerulla.)

Author Isabel Allende will be in conversation with Berkeley professor Beatriz Manz about her new novel, Maya's Notebook. In it, Allende narrates the tumultuous life of Maya Vidal. Raised by her Chilean grandparents in Berkeley, California, Maya steps off the straight and narrow when her grandfather dies and ends up addicted and on the run in Las Vegas. Eventually found by her grandmother, Maya is sent to Chiloe, a remote island off the coast of southern Chile, to hide from her pursuers. There she tries to rebuild her life, sheltered by a septuagenarian recluse still haunted by his years as a political prisoner.

Isabel Allende is the award-winning author of 19 books, including The House of Spirits and Eva Luna. Her works have been translated into 35 languages and have sold 57 million copies worldwide.

Thursday, April 25, 6:00 pm
Booth Auditorium, Berkeley Law School, 2778 Bancroft Way

Video, podcast, and photos of this event


BALA Spring 2013, Fog at the Golden Gate, by Toby Harriman.

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Mathias Craig
From the Classroom to the Field: Building Energy and Water Systems in
Remote Nicaragua

Irrigation during the dry season in a drought-affected Nicaragua. (Photo courtesy of CIAT - International Center for Tropical Agriculture.)
Irrigation during the dry season in a drought-affected Nicaragua. (Photo courtesy of CIAT - International Center for Tropical Agriculture.)

blueEnergy delivers energy, water, and sanitation to some of the world’s most isolated communities, providing a foundation for health, education, and economic opportunity. While remote, these communities are at the center of the battle over indigenous rights and eco-system sustainability — and their fates are closely linked to ours. Craig will discuss blueEnergy’s work on the Caribbean coast of Nicaragua and its focus on creating a learning platform for future leaders interested in energy, water, and international development.

Mathias Craig is a UC Berkeley alum and the co-founder and executive director of blueEnergy.

Monday, April 29, 12:00 - 1:15 pm
554 Barrows Hall

Video and photos of the event


Film Screening
Shenandoah
Directed by David Turnley (United States, 2012)

Crystal Dillman, fiancée of the slain Luis Ramirez, at an anti-illegal immigration rally.
Crystal Dillman, fiancée of the slain Luis Ramirez, at an anti-illegal immigration rally in Shenandoah. (Photo courtesy of David Turnley.)

Shenandoah, a coal-mining town with a proud immigrant past, once fueled America’s industrial revolution. Today, it is a town in decline, and the descendants of yesterday’s European immigrants rub shoulders with the Mexican immigrants of today. Tensions came to a head when four white football players were charged in the beating death of Luis Ramirez, an undocumented Mexican migrant. In the documentary “Shenandoah,” Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer turned director David Turnley creates a deeply felt portrait of a working-class community torn apart by violence. 97 minutes. English.

“It was a tragedy that touched upon several great national themes — the dislocation wrought by fading industry, the turmoil of immigration, the endurance of sports…” — Sam Dolnick, The New York Times

“The human drama of the story kept unraveling in ways start to finish that you never would have imagined.” — David Turnley

Director David Turnley will hold a question-and-answer session after the film.

Free tickets will also be available at the door on a first-come, first-served basis.

Trailer for the film

Monday, April 29, 6:30 pm
145 Dwinelle Hall

Video and photos of the event


Photo from Elite Squad: The Enemy Within

Series:
Cine Latino

La Sirga
Directed by William Vega (Colombia, 2011)

Image from La Sirga.
(Image from La Sirga.)

Fleeing the armed violence that has claimed her family, Alicia finds refuge at La Sirga, a rundown lakeside guesthouse owned by her taciturn uncle Óscar, the only relative she has left. There, amidst the sound of distant thunder, she tries to rebuild her life while the war she sought to escape inches closer. 90 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

“A slow-burn Andean fable of considerable evocative power…” — Lee Marshall, Screen Daily

Wednesday, May 1, 7:00 pm
Room 150, Goldman School of Public Policy


Author Talk
Guadalupe Nettel

Please come for a conversation with Guadalupe Nettel on her writing and on the questions and parctices explored in Mexican literature today.

Guadalupe Nettel is one of Mexico’s most important contemporary writers. Winner of a numerous prestigious literary prizes, most recently the Premio Internacional Ribera del Duero. She is the author of three short story collections - Juegos de artificio, Les jours fossiles and Pétalos y otras historias incómodas - and two novels - El cuerpo en que nací and El huésped. She holds a Ph.D. from Paris’ École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales.

Co-sponsored by CLAS, Spanish & Portuguese, Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Friday, May 3, 12:30 - 2:00 pm
5125 Dwinelle (Spanish & Portuguese Library)


Claudia Paz y Paz
Justice and Rule of Law: Keys for Democracy in Guatemala

As Guatemala’s first female attorney general, Claudia Paz Y Paz has made unprecedented strides in the prosecution of organized crime, political corruption, and human rights. In addition to securing convictions against the four Guatemalan soldiers found responsible for the 1982 Dos Erres massacre, she successfully brought Efraín Ríos Montt, the former president who presided over Guatemala’s scorched earth campaign, to trial. Paz y Paz was recently honored by U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and will receive the 2013 Judith Lee Stronach Human Rights Award from The Center for Justice and Accountability on May 14, 2013 in San Francisco.

Commentator: Richard M. Buxbaum is the Jackson H. Ralston Professor of International Law (Emeritus) at UC Berkeley.

Wednesday, May 15, 10:30 am
554 Barrows Hall

We also have video commentaries about the Ríos Montt trial from:

- Aryeh Neier, the founding executive director of Human Rights Watch
- Naomi Roht-Arriaza, professor at UC Hastings School of Law

Anthropologist and UC Berkeley Professor, Beatriz Manz testified for the prosecution in the trial. See her photos from research in Guatemala and Mexico during 1982-83.

 
© 2012, The Regents of the University of California, Last Updated - June 11, 2013