SPRING 1999 CALENDAR OF EVENTS


Professors Madeira and Veloso with students at CLAS
"Leituras Brasileiras: Pensamento Social e Literatura No Brasil"

Maria Angelica Madeira, Professor of Literature and Sociology, and Mariza Veloso, Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the Universidade de Brasilia and the Instituto Rio Branco will be teaching this seminar for the second year in a row.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Monday, January 25 through Friday, January 29, 2:00-4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Nineth Montenegro
"Will the Guatemalan Government enact the constitutional changes mandated by the 1996 Peace Accords?"

Congresswoman and spokesperson for the Frente Democratico Nueva Guatemala (FDNG), the Democratic Front for a New Guatemala, will be speaking on the Peace Process in Guatemala as we enter the third year of the peace accords, specifically the contribution that the FDNG has made and the constitutional reforms they are pressing for during this election year, 1999.

Congresswoman Montenegro was one of the original founders of the Grupo de Apoyo Mutuo, one of the first human rights groups formed by survivors of the violent repression of the 1980's. The FDNG was formed as a political party just 40 days prior to the general elections in November of 1995. The popular support was so great that this fledgling political party gained six seats in congress.

Congresswoman Montenegro was recently honored by the Human Rights Ombudsman of Guatemala for her continued work to promote the rights of Women and Children. As chair of the Committee for the Rights of Women and Children, she has brought the case of Guatemala before the Inter-American Human Rights Court of the Organization of American States for failing to implement congressional reforms to properly protect the rights of Women and Children.

Thursday, January 28, 5:15-6:30 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Fernando Flores
"Commitment, Trust, and the Nature of Work"

Fernando Flores, founder and president of Business Design Associates, is author of Disclosing New Worlds: Entrepreneurship, Democratic Action, and the Cultivation of Solidarity with Charles Spinosa, and Hubert L. Dreyfus, MIT Press, 1997.

Wednesday, February 17, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Alma Guillermoprieto
"Samba"

Alma Guillermoprieto following her performance
Alma Guillermoprieto, a former dancer, has written extensively about Latin America for The New York Review of Books and The New Yorker. Her first book, Samba, was nominated for the National Book Critic's Circle Award. It was described in The Washington Post as the "single best book ever written about the central place of music in the life of the Third World".

Alma Guillermoprieto will be combining pieces of her writings with a vibrant live performance based on her experiences living and dancing with Rio's Sambistas in Brazil.

Thursday, February 18, 6:00 p.m.
Graduate School of Journalism, 121 North Gate Hall, Room 105

Analysis and commentary for this event


Lynn Stephens
"Chiapas: Militarization, Paramilitarization and the Closing of Social and Political Space"

Lynn Stephens is an Anthropologist who has written extensively about social movements in Latin America. Her book, Women and Social Movements in Latin America brings particular insight into issues of women's rights and human rights. Drawing on her own considerable fieldwork, she is one of the most informed and thoughtful observers of the present situation in Oaxaca and Chiapas.

Friday, February 19, 12:00-2:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Diamela Eltit
"Conversaciones con Diamela Eltit"

Diamela Eltit (right) with Professor Francine Masiello
Diamela Eltit is among Chile's most important contemporary writers. Author of six novels and numerous essays and critical studies, she has secured a place in Latin American culture for her avant-garde experimentalism in literature, performance, and interdisciplinary projects. Her most recent novel is Los Trabajadores de la Muerte (1998).

Co-sponsored with the Departments of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature.

Monday, February 22, 12:00 p.m.
370 Dwinelle Hall


"Brazil Today: Social and Economic Impacts of the Crisis"
Vilmar Faria and Antonio Barros de Castro

Antonio Barros de Castro (left) and Wilmar Faria talk after their presentation.
Vilmar Faria, Special Advisor to Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, is a Harvard-trained sociologist and currently holds Berkeley's Rio Branco Chair. Professor Faria has worked for many years as a researcher, teacher, and policy-maker in Brazil and is internationally known as an expert on social issues in Latin America. He has taught as a Professor in the Sociology Departments of the University of Sao Paulo and the University of Campinas and has also served as the President of the Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP) and as Executive Director of the Fundacao para o Desenvolvimento Administrativo de Sao Paulo (FUNDAP).

Antonio Barros de Castro is a professor of economic policy at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro and a member of the Council of the Instituto Nacional de Altos Estudos. He received his Ph.D. in economics from UNICAMP in Brazil.

Thursday, February 25, 1:00-3:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Rafael Barajas ("El Fisgón")
"Humor and the Politics of Information: Jokes and Politicians--A Redundancy"

Rafael Barajas illustrates a point in the CLAS Conference Room.
Rafael Barajas, also known as El Fisgón, has been a cartoonist for the Mexico City daily La Jornada for several years. He has published illustrated essays and books on topics such as the role of the press in politics, President Salinas' administration, Mexico's neoliberal project, the North American Free Trade Agreement, and Mexican cartoons and cartoonists in the 19th Century. El Fisgón will speak about the importance of cartoons and humor in political discourse and the relationship between alternative media and politics.

Co-sponsored with the Graduate School of Journalism

Thursday, March 4, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Vilmar E. Faria
"Exclusion and the Welfare System"
First in a series of two lectures,
"Poverty and Inequality in a Global Economy: A Brazilian Perspective"

Vilmar Faria speaking at CLAS on March 11.

Vilmar Faria, Special Advisor to Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, is a Harvard-trained Sociologist and currently holds Berkeley's Rio Branco Chair. Professor Faria has worked for many years as a researcher, teacher, and policy-maker in Brazil and is internationally known as an expert on social issues in Latin America. He has taught as a Professor in the Sociology Departments of the University of Sao Paulo and the University of Campinas and has also served as the President of the Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP) and as Executive Director of the Fundacao para o Desenvolvimento Administrativo de Sao Paulo (FUNDAP).


Thursday, March 11, 2:00-4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Panel Discussion
"The Implications of the Pinochet Case"

Four human rights specialists discuss the Pinochet extradition case and its legal implications, featuring:

Naomi Roht-Arriaza, Professor, Hastings College of the Law
Margarita Lacabe, Executive Director, Derechos Human Rights
Patty Blum, Director, International Human Rights Law Clinic and Lecturer, Boalt School of Law
Eric Stover, Director, Center for Human Rights, UC Berkeley

Related website: National Security Archive, recently declassified documents about the Pinochet coup

Tuesday, March 16, 4:30 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Eliane Gonçalves
"Sexuality in Education: A Look at the National Curricula Parameters in Brazil"

Eliane Gonçalves at CLAS.
Eliane Gonçalves is a Public Health Worker at Grupo Transas do Corpo, a feminist NGO in Goiás, Brazil, which she co-founded and where she has worked on educational activities in health and sexuality. She has also worked with the Program for Integral Assistance to Women's Health at the Health Secretariat of the State of Goiás over the past 12 years. Her accomplishments include the development, planning and implementation of a sex education project that targeted eleven public schools and reached 5,000 enrolled students directly and hundreds of other youths indirectly. As the recipient of a three-year fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation's Fund for Leadership Development and the David Bell Research Fellow at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, Ms. Gonçalves conducted a study to examine the question of how to prepare school teachers to comfortably and effectively teach sex education.

Wednesday, March 31, 1999, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Ana Gonzalez Montes
"Genocide in Guatemala: Results of the Commission on Historical Clarification"

Ana Gonzalez Montes addresses her audience at CLAS.
Anthropologist Ana Gonzalez Montes has served as an Observer for Human Rights of the United Nations Mission for Guatemala(MINUGUA) for the past three years. She is an international consultant of the Oficina de Apoyo a la Comisión para el Esclarecimiento Histórico, and a member of the team that wrote the recommendations for the final decision of the Commission on Historical Clarification.



Thursday, April 1, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Vilmar E. Faria
"The Brazilian Crisis and the Politics of Welfare Reform"
Second in a series of two lectures,
"Poverty and Inequality in a Global Economy: A Brazilian Perspective"


Vilmar Faria, Special Advisor to Brazilian President Fernando Henrique Cardoso, is a Harvard-trained Sociologist and currently holds Berkeley's Rio Branco Chair. Professor Faria has worked for many years as a researcher, teacher, and policy-maker in Brazil and is internationally known as an expert on social issues in Latin America. He has taught as a Professor in the Sociology Departments of the University of Sao Paulo and the University of Campinas and has also served as the President of the Brazilian Center for Analysis and Planning (CEBRAP) and as Executive Director of the Fundacao para o Desenvolvimento Administrativo de Sao Paulo (FUNDAP).

Thursday, April 1, 2:00-4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Symposium
"Urban and Regional Links in the Global Age: Development and Integration in Latin America"

Five regional and urban development cases will address issues of decentralization, sustainability, social equity, citizen participation, emerging institutions, and government restructuring. These studies aim to improve planning practices and strengthen policy-making in Latin America. This symposium will also provide an opportunity to foster an exchange of information and experiences among cities and regions in the continent.

Professor Harley Shaiken, Opening Remarks

Gilberto Buenaño "Regional Decentralization and Deconcentration: The Orinoco-Apure River Basin Development Plan" (Venezuela)
author bio and abstract of the paper
Cecilia Collados "Creating Environmental Institutions in Response to International Demand: The Case of Chile"
author bio and abstract of the paper
Clara Irázabal "Governance and the Practices of Urbanism: The Politics of Development in Curitiba" (Brazil)
author bio and abstract of the paper
Saúl Pineda "Medellín and its Metropolitan Area: From Narco-traffic Crisis to Intelligent Urban Region" (Colombia)
author bio and abstract of the paper
Miriam Chion "The Spatial Transformation of Newly Industrializing Metropolitan Regions in the Global Context: The Case of Metropolitan Lima in the 1990's" (Peru)
author bio and abstract for the paper

Prof. Manuel Castells Concluding Remarks

Co-sponsored with the Institute for Urban and Regional Development and
the Berkeley Environmental Design Association
Cecilia Collados
Gilberto Buenaño

Friday, April 2, 1999, 9:15-1:30 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Hilda Sábato
"Recent Perspectives on Political Citizenship in 19th Century Latin American Studies"

Hilda Sábato at CLAS.

Hilda Sábato, Ph.D., from the University of London, is a prominent Argentine Historian from the Universidad de Buenos Aires. She is a former Visiting Fellow at the Princeton Center for Advanced Study, and is currently a Visiting Scholar at the Stanford Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences. A prolific writer, she is well known for her volumes on: Los Trabajadores de Buenos Aires. La Experiencia del Mercado, and most recently, La Política en Las Calles. Entre el Voto y la Movilización, Buenos Aires, 1862-1890.

Monday, April 5, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Carlos F. Chamorro
"Hurricane Mitch: The Politics of Reconstruction in Central America"

Carlos F. Chamorro is a Nicaraguan television and print journalist specializing in issues of media and democracy. Prof. Chamorro is teaching a course on International Reporting at the Graduate School of Journalism and is conducting research on issues of media and democracy in Central America. From 1980 to 1994, Chamorro was the Editor-in-Chief of the Sandinista newspaper Barricada and a member of the Sandinista Assembly.
[PHOTO: Carlos Chamorro at CLAS.]

Thursday, April 8, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Acisclo Valladares Molina
"In Search of a Reencuentro That Will Serve Guatemalan-U.S. Relations"

Acisclo Valladares Molina

Lic. Acisclo Valladares Molina is a former Attorney General of the Government of Guatemala and a former Director of the Public Ministry. He has also represented Guatemala at the United Nations. Lic. Valladares is an internationally recognized advocate of legal reform and of international efforts to strengthen the accountability of democratic institutions and processes in the Central American region.

Tuesday, April 13, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Discussion Panel
"Truth, Human Rights, and History: The Case of Rigoberta Menchu"

From left to right: Robin Kirk, Beatriz Manz, José Rabasa, and Victor Montejo.
José Rabasa, Moderator, Spanish and Portuguese, UC Berkeley
Robin Kirk, Human Rights Watch
Victor Montejo, Native American Studies, UC Davis
David Stoll, Anthropology, Middlebury College
Beatriz Manz, Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley

Co-sponsored with the Center for Human Rights, UC Berkeley

Tuesday, April 13, 4:00 p.m.
Geballe Room, Townsend Center, 220 Stephens


Mark Danner
"Haiti's Twin Legacies: Duvalier and Aristide"

Danner, a staff member at The New Yorker Magazine is currently working on a book about Haiti, forthcoming from Alfred A. Knopf titled Beyond the Mountains: Haiti and The Legacy of Duvalier. In 1990, Danner won the Magazine Award for Reporting for his coverage of the island nation. In 1993, he won an Overseas Press Club award for his investigative reporting of the notorious massacre in the remote Salvadoran town, El Mozote, and wrote his first book based on a New Yorker article on the massacre. The book, The Massacre at El Mozote: A Parable of the Cold War was published by Vintage in 1994. Danner is also working in conjunction with Eric Stover and the Human Rights Center at U.C. Berkeley.

Cosponsored with the Human Rights Center, U.C. Berkeley

Wednesday, April 14, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Michael Kearney
"The Anthropology of Migration across the Mexican-U.S. and the U.S.-Mexican Borders"

Michael Kearney, a Professor of Anthropology at U.C. Riverside, has worked with transnational Zapotec and Mixtec communities. His research takes him from the cloud forests of Oaxaca, to colonias of border cities, to the many Latino enclaves throughout California. In his lecture he will be looking at movements between Mexico and the United States. He will contrast an emergent anthropology of "migration" with the scholarship and research on "immigration" that prevails in the social sciences and policy making.

Co-sponsored with the Rural Mexican Working Group

Thursday, April 15, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Carlos Monsiváis
"México, 1968-1999: This is the Way the Century Ends"

Carlos Monsiváis, one of Mexico's most influential and prolific writers, is known for his independence of mind and for his chronicles of daily life in Mexico City. He writes about and documents cultural and political change in La Jornada and other dailies. Some of his recent books include The Ritual of Chaos, and Mexican Postcards

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Monday, April 19, 4:00 p.m.
The Toll Room, Alumni House


Contemporary History Roundtable
"Latin America: The Future of the State, the State of the Future"

From left to right: José Murilo de Carvalho, Hilda Sábato, Carlos Marichal, and Linda Lewin.
Moderator:
Linda Lewin
, History Department, U.C. Berkeley

Panelists:
José Murilo de Carvalho
, Fundãçao Casa De Rui Barbosa, Rio de Janeiro
Hilda Sábato
, Historian, Universidad de Buenos Aires
Carlos Marichal
, The Center for Historical Studies, El Colegio de México

Co-sponsored with the Department of History

Thursday, April 22, 4:00 p.m.
3335 Dwinelle Hall


Mario Samper
"Coffee Commodity Chains"

Mario Samper

Historian Mario Samper is a professor at the Universidad de Costa Rica where he specializes in economic, social and political history of coffee in Latin America. He wrote Producción Cafetalera y Poder Politico en Centroamerica and co-edited Coffee, Society, and Power in Latin America.

Monday, April 26, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Susan Eckstein
"The Strength of Weak States/Weak Societies: Cuba in the 1990s"

Susan Eckstein, Professor of Sociology at Boston University, and former President of the Latin American Studies Association (LASA), will be speaking about her recent research on Cuba.

Prof. Eckstein is author of Back from the Future: Cuba under Castro, The Poverty of Revolution: The State and Urban Poor in Mexico, The Impact of Revolution: Analysis of Mexico and Bolivia, and the editor of Power and Popular Protest: Latin American Social Movements.

Monday, April 26, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event



Liam Mahony

"Getting in Harm's Way: Nonviolent Intervention
for Human Rights in Latin America"

Liam Mahony, from Peace Brigades International, a grassroots human rights organization, is the coauthor of Unarmed Bodyguards: International Accompaniment for the Protection of Human Rights. He will speak about his work with human rights workers and others under threat in areas of political conflict.

Tuesday, April 27, 12:30-1:30 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Silvia Solorzano
"Women and Electoral Registration:
Political Activism in Guatemala Today"

A medical doctor by training, Silvia Solorzano is a prominent leader in Guatemala's gender movement, as well as the highest ranking woman within the URNG. She is actively involved in registering Guatemalan women to vote in the 1999 elections.

Thursday, April 29, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


José Gregori
"Human Rights in Brazil"

From left to right: José Gregori, Fabrizio Rigout, Harley Shaiken
José Gregori, Brazilian Secretary of State for Human Rights, received the prestigious U.N. Prize for Human Rights in December 1998 in recognition for his work in Brazil. Gregori has been the principal architect of the government's current human rights policy and has headed the human rights office since its inception in March 1997.

Commentators:
Naomi Roht-Arriaza, University of California, Hastings College of the Law
Connie De La Vega, University of San Francisco, Human Rights Advocates

Monday, May 3, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
370 Dwinelle Hall

Analysis and commentary, additional documents, photos,
and transcript for this event


Sister Susan Mika and Martha Ojeda
"Worker Rights in the Maquiladoras on the U.S.-Mexico Border"

Sister Susan Mika (left) and Martha Ojeda
Martha Ojeda
Sister Susan Mika is Board President and Martha Ojeda is the Executive Director of the Coalition for Justice in the Maquiladoras. CJM is a tri-national coalition of 150 religious, environmental, labor, Latino and women's groups organizing to protect the environment, working conditions and a fair standard of living for maquiladora workers along the U.S.-Mexican border. Sister Susan Mika and Amrtha Ojeda will be touring the Bay area to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the coalition.

Friday, May 7, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Esteban Moctezuma
"Mexico's Social Challenges for the 21st Century"

From left: Michael Nacht, Dean of the School of Public Policy; Mexican Secretary Esteban Moctezuma; and Maria Massolo, Vice-Chair, Center for Latin American Studies
Esteban Moctezuma is the Secretary of Social Development in Mexico. He has held several other high-level positions within the Mexican government such as Chief Officer of the Ministry of Programming and Budget; Chief Officer of the Ministry of Public Education; Undersecretary of the Ministry of Education; and Special Advisor to the President on New Federalism. In 1997, he was elected Senator to the Federal District (Mexico City), and in 1998 Moctezuma was appointed by President Zedillo as Secretary of Social Development of Mexico.

Co-sponsored with the Richard and Rhoda Goldman School of Public Policy and
the Berkeley Mexican Student Association

Friday, May 7, 1:00-2:30 p.m.
Faculty Club, Heyns Room


David Fleischer
"The Difficult Road to Reform in Brazil: Elections, Governors, Exchange Rates, and CPIs"

Dr. Fleischer is a Professor of Political Science and Coordinator of the Nucleus of Institutional Studies and Public Policy at the Universidade de Brasília. He has written extensively about political parties in Brazil, democratic and economic transitions, and other aspects of politics and public policy.


Friday, May 7, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Coro Hispano de San Francisco
"Corridos y Cantos de Mayo"

From the diverse folk traditions of Mexico, Coro Hispano draws together a program both rich and varied to celebrate the fiestas of the month of May. Guest artist Enrique Ramirez brings to the program a selection of spirited corridos commemorating the struggles of the people on both sides of the U.S.-Mexican border.

Admission: $12 general, $10 students, children under 16 free

Co-sponsored with The International House and the Instituto Pro Música de California

Saturday, May 8, 8:00 p.m.
Chevron Auditorium, International House


Miguel Angel Rodriguez, the President of Costa Rica,
the First Lady, and members of his cabinet visit Berkeley
President Miguel Angel Rodriguez and Professor Beatriz Manz

On May 21, 1999 CLAS hosted an intimate breakfast meeting with the President of Costa Rica, the First Lady, and a number of other members of his cabinet. During the meeting the President fielded questions from and exchanged ideas with UCB Latin Americanist faculty Beatriz Manz (former director of CLAS), Bernard Nietchmann, Drew Dougherty, Harley Shaiken (CLAS Chair), and Maria Massolo (CLAS vice-chair). CLAS-affiliated graduate students Leah Rosenbloom and Angelina Snodgrass Godoy, both of whom do research on Costa Rican issues, also took part in the meeting.

Later that afternoon, President Rodriguez, a UCB alumni, delivered a speech at the graduation ceremony in the Economics Department.

Pictures from the visit
Write-up of the conversation

Friday, May 21, 1999
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

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