SPRING 2002 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

February | March | April | May

Series
Brazil: Culture, Society and Politics

Professor Maria Angelica Madeira and Professor Mariza Veloso
Graduate Seminar: "Leituras Brasileiras: Pensamento Social e Literatura no Brasil"

"Leituras Brasileiras" is a graduate seminar offered by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, and the Brazilian Consulate. The course will be taught by: Maria Angelica Madeira, Professor of Literature and Sociology and Mariza Veloso, Professor of Anthropology and Sociology at the Universidade de Brasilia and the Instituto Rio Branco.

Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, February 4, 6, and 8,
11:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. and 1:00-2:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photo of the event


Tulio Halperin Donghi
"Trying to Make Sense of Argentina"

Tulio Halperin Donghi is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of History at UC Berkeley. A distinguished scholar of Latin America, Professor Halperin Donghi received the Award for Scholarly Distinction from the American Historical Association in 1998 for excellence in teaching and research. Among his numerous publications are Un conflicto nacional: moriscos y cristianos viejos en Valencia, El Río de la Plata al comenzar el siglo XIX, and Tradición política española e ideología revolucionaria de Mayo

Thursday, February 7, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Sebastião Salgado
Avenali Lecture

In conjunction with his exhibit, "Migrations," at the UC Berkeley and Pacific Film Archive, internationally-acclaimed photographer Sebastiao Salgado will deliver this year's Avenali Lecture. He will discuss the subject matter of his photographs: the migration of peoples worldwide in response to poverty, repression, and war. Following will be a conversation with Orville Schell, Dean of the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

The Center for Latin American Studies is a cosponsor of "Migrations," on view January 16 through March 24.

Monday, February 11, 7:30 p.m.
Wheeler Auditorium

Analysis and commentary for this event


Professor Salvador Samayoa
"El Salvador: La reforma pactada"

Salvador Samayoa is Professor of Philosophy at the Universidad Centroamericana José Simeón Cañas (UCA) in El Salvador. In October 1979 he was named Minister of Education for the Junta Revolucionaria de Gobierno; in January 1980 he joined a political-military organization that previously had formed the Frente Farabundo Martí para la Liberación Nacional (FMLN). He was President of the Consejo Nacional de Seguridad Publica of El Salvador and is part of the Comisión Nacional de Desarollo. Professor Samayoa has written extensively for journals in his country.

(Presentation in Spanish)

Wednesday, February 13, 12:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Professor José Carlos Chiaramonte
"Fundamentos Jusnaturalistas de los Movimientos de la Independencia Iberoamericana"

José Carlos Chiaramonte is an Emeritus Professor in the Department of Philosophy at the Universidad de Buenos Aires. He is the director of the Instituto de Historia Argentina y Americana at the Universidad de Buenos Aires and a researcher for the Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET). Among his numerous scholarly publications are Nacionalismo y liberalismo económicos en Argentina, 1860-1880, La crítica illustrada de la realidad, and Formas de sociedad y economía en Hispanoamérica.

(in Spanish)

Thursday, February 14, 12:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Series
Colombia 2002

Professor Charles Bergquist
"The Left and the Paradoxes of Modern Colombian History"

Charles Bergquist is a professor of history, specializing in labor and Latin America, at the University of Washington. He has directed the University of Washington Latin American Studies Program and held the Harry Bridges Chair in Labor Studies. He is former Director of International Studies at Duke University and has on several occasions taught at the National University of Colombia in Bogota. He is author of Coffee and Conflict in Colombia and Labor in Latin America, and co-editor of Violence in Colombia, 1900-2000.

Moderated by Professor Margaret Chowning, Department of History, UC Berkeley

Thursday, February 14, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and commentary for this event


Art Opening
Eros Hoagland, "Colombia's Silent War"

Photographs by Eros Hoagland

February 4 - May 31, 2002
For gallery hours, please call us at (510) 642-2088

Join us for the opening reception:

Thursday, February 28, 6:00-8:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Artist's Statement and Gallery
Photo of the event


Series
Confict, Memory and Transitions

Professor Elizabeth Lira
"Observations on a Social Psychology of Reconciliation"

Elizabeth Lira is a Chilean psychologist and professor at the Universidad Jesuita Alberto Hurtado. Her current research focuses on Chilean reconciliation and resistance of memory. She is a supervisor for PRAIS, a public and mental health program for victims of domestic violence and human rights violations during the 1973-1990 dictatorship. Professor Lira has co-authored two books with San Diego State University Professor Brian Loveman on political reconciliation, and written a number of other books related to the collective memory of victims of human rights abuses.

Monday, March 4, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and Commentary for this event


Series
Colombia 2002

Alfredo Molano
"Conversación Abierta sobre el Conflicto Colombiano"

Alfredo Molano is a Colombian writer and journalist. He has dedicated much of his work to issues of displacement, peasant social movements, and the colonization of frontier lands. Mr. Molano has served as an advisor to the World Bank in its Peace and Justice Project and is currently a Visiting Scholar at Stanford University.

(in Spanish)

Thursday, March 7, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photo of the event


Professor Denise Dresser
Graduate Seminar: "Mexico's Transition to Democracy: Problems and Prospects"

In dramatic contrast with previous decades, Mexico is changing at a very fast pace. As a result of unprecedented transformations, Mexico has ceased to be the "living museum" of Latin American politics, whose institutions and practices were well known. Today, in contrast, the study of Mexico is an exercise in uncertainty and unpredictability. The objective of the seminar will be to explore the causes, dynamics and consequences of the "transition." The course will focus on three main areas: executive-legislative relations and divided government, the transformation of Mexico's electoral and party systems, and the impact of new actors in the country's political geography (i.e., the media, NGO's, transnational human rights networks).

Denise Dresser is Visiting Fellow at the Pacific Council on International Policy at the University of Southern California, on leave from her post as professor of political science at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM).The author of numerous articles and monographs on Mexican politics and U.S.-Mexico relations, she writes a political column for the Mexico City newspaper Reforma and the weekly Proceso, and frequently comments on Mexican politics in the U.S. media. Dr. Dresser received her Ph.D. from Princeton University.

Fridays in March (8th, 15th & 22nd), 1:00-4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street
LAS 298 1 unit, pass/no-pass grading option

This course has a limited enrollment.

To obtain a class entry code, interested graduate students must submit a brief narrative describing their interest and experience in the subject matter. Please email this statement to tstojkov@uclink.berkeley.edu no later than March 1, 2002.

Please note: application deadline has been extended.


Series
Confict, Memory and Transitions

Amy Ross
"From Pinochet to Milosevic: International Law and the Prosecution of the Powerful"

NOTICE: Due to unforeseeable circumstances, Professor Ross' talk was cancelled. We hope to reschedule her presentation for some time in the near future.

Amy Ross is Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Georgia. Prof. Ross received a Ph. D. in Geography from the University of California, Berkeley. She did a comparative study of truth commissions for her dissertation entitled, The Body of the Truth: Truth Commissions in Guatemala and South Africa. Professor Ross has conducted research at the International Criminal Tribunal for the ex-Yugoslavia for the past two years and has recently returned from observing the first two weeks of the Milosevic trial in The Hague.

Tuesday, March 12, 12:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series
Cine Chile

Film Presentation
La luna en el espejo / The Moon in the Mirror, by Silvio Caiozzi (1990)

En clave metafórica La luna en el espejo representa el Chile de los tiempos de Pinochet. Viejo y enfermo, el protagonista controla autoritariamente desde su cama los movimentos y las actividades de su casa, y en particular de un hijo obediente y sumiso que al mismo tiempo desea y teme la libertad.

The Moon in the Mirror metaphorically represents Chile in the Pinochet years. Old and sick, the authoritarian protagonist controls the movements and activities of his household, in particular an obedient and submissive son that both desires and fears his liberty.

(In Spanish, without subtitles)

Wednesday, March 13, 6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series
Colombia 2002

Professor Mary Roldan
"La Violencia in Historical Perspective: Implications for an Analysis of the Contemporary Conflict in Colombia"

Mary Roldan is a professor of Latin American history at Cornell University. An important figure in the new generation of Colombian historians, Professor Roldan has written on issues of violence, identity, historical socio-cultural aspects of the drug trade, and political movement in Colombia.

Thursday, March 14, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photo of the event


Series
Cine Chile

La frontera / The Frontier, by Ricardo Larrain (1991)

Durante los últimos años de la dictadura de Pinochet, Ramiro Orellana es condenado al exilio. La frontera es un lugar devastador, donde se encontrará con personajes singulares. La frontera fue muy premiado, recibiendo el Oso de Plata en el Festival de Berlin en 1992 y Mejor Director en el Festival de la Habana en 1992.

During the military dictatorship of Chile, Ramiro Orellana is sentenced to internal exile. The Frontier is a desolate land inhabited by the world's castaways. The Frontier won many awards including the Silver Bear at Berlin in 1992 and Best Director at the Havana Film Festival in 1992.

(In Spanish, without subtitles)

Wednesday, March 20, 6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Professor Aníbal Quijano
"Coloniality of Power in the Modern World"

(First of a three-day series of lectures on the coloniality of power)

Aníbal Quijano is a professor of sociology at the Universidad de San Marcos in Lima and at the State University of New York in Binghamton. Professor Quijano helped to originally formulate dependency theory in Latin America. His current research examines the "coloniality of power" and its implications for the formation of the modern world-system.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, and the Graduate Theological Union

Wednesday, April 3, 4:00 p.m.

Analysis and commentary on this event


Series
Cine Chile

Fernando ha vuelto / Fernando Has Returned, by Silvio Caiozzi (1998)

Fernando ha vuelto del laureado cineasta chileno Silvio Caiozzi documenta la historia real de Agave Díaz, viuda de Fernando Olivares Mori, quien fue detenido y ejecutado a los 27 años de edad.  Caiozzi documenta el sufrimiento de Díaz al enterarse que entre los restos del patio 29 se encontraban aquellos de su esposo Fernando despues de 25 años de desaparecido.

Fernando Has Returned by the distinguished Chilean cinematographer, Silvio Caiozzi, documents the true story of Agave Díaz, widow of Fernando Olivares Mori who was detained and executed at the age of 27. Caiozzi documents Diaz's pain upon discovering that her husband's remains were found after having "disappeared" 25 years ago.

(In Spanish, without subtitles)

Also:

Estadio Nacional / National Stadium, by Carmen Luz Parot (2001)

Estadio nacional, ganador del Premio Especial del Jurado en el Quinto Festival de Cine Documental, "es un filme documental sobre los sobrevivientes y como tal tiene esa carga de agradecimiento, esperanza y buen humor de los que vieron la cara del horror y han regresado a la vida," según Rodrigo González, crítico de La Tercera.

National Stadium, winner of the Juries Special Prize at the Fifth Festival of Cinematic Documentary, "is a documentary about the survivors and as such it is charged with the hope, happiness, humor and thankfulness of those who saw the face of horror and have had the good fortune to return to life," states Rodrigo González, film critic for La Tercera.

(In Spanish, without subtitles)

Wednesday, April 3, 6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Professor Sergio Aguayo
Graduate Seminar: "Mexico's Transition to Democracy: The Role of Human Rights and Security"

Sergio Aguayo is a leading scholar and commentator on human rights in Mexico. He has been actively involved in the promotion of democracy and human rights through such organizations as Civic Alliance and the Mexican Academy of Human Rights. Professor Aguayo teaches at El Colegio de México's Center for International Relations. He will be in residence at UC Berkeley for the month of April. In addition to giving a public lecture, he will be offering a graduate seminar at the Center for Latin American Studies.

Thursdays in April (4th, 11th, 18th & 25th), 1:00-4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street
LAS 298 1 unit, pass/no-pass grading option
This course has a limited enrollment.

To obtain a class entry code, please submit a brief narrative describing your interest in the seminar to tstojkov@uclink.berkeley.edu no later than March 1, 2002.

Please note: application deadline has been extended.


Professor Walter Mignolo
"Rethinking the Colonial Model"
(Second of a three-day series of lectures on the coloniality of power)

Walter Mignolo is a professor of cultural anthropology and romance language at Duke University. His research focuses on semiotics and the complicity between eurocentric forms of knowledge production and global coloniality. His recent publications include The Darker Side of the Renaissance and Local Histories/Global Designs.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, and the Graduate Theological Union

Thursday, April 4, 6:00 p.m.
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

Photo of the event


Professor Enrique Dussel
"Modernity, Coloniality, and Capitalism in the World System"

(Third of a three-day series of lectures on the coloniality of power)

Enrique Dussel is a professor of philosophy at the Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana in Mexico. He is the founder of Liberation Philosophy and Ethics of Liberation in Latin America. A world-recognized philosopher and theologian, he has published more than fifty books.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Ethnic Studies, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, and the Graduate Theological Union.

Friday, April 5, 2:00 p.m.
3 Leconte Hall

Analysis and photo of the event


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Jeffrey Hermanson
"Challenges for the Contemporary Mexican Labor Movement"

Jeffrey Hermanson has been a union organizer for 25 years with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union and its successor UNITE. He formerly was the director of organizing for the carpenters' union, and is currently Field Representative with the American Center for International Labor Solidarity in Mexico City.

Monday, April 8, 9:00 a.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series
Colombia 2002

Enrique Peñalosa
Former Mayor of Bogota
"Towards a More Socially and Environmentally Sustainable Third World City"

Hailed as one of the most progressive mayors in Latin America, Mr. Penalosa served as Mayor of Bogota from 1998-2001. During his administration he spearheaded large improvements to the city's infrastructure. He is currently working on a book that proposes a new model for the Third World city.

Analysis and photo of the event
Background paper
Mr. Penalosa's Biography
Pictures of civic improvements in Bogota

Monday, April 8, 2002, 5:00 p.m.
Morrison Room, 101 Doe Library


Series
Cine Chile


El chacotero sentimental / The Sentimental Teaser, by Gaspar Galaz (2000)

Cuando un joven y excéntrico locutor de radio deja que los radioescuchas llamen para contar sus historias de amor, el show se convierte en un éxitoso santuario donde los más profundos enredos pasionales son expuestos publicamente.

When a young and eccentric radio announcer lets anonymous listeners call in to tell their tales of love, the show becomes a success and a sanctuary where people's deepest passions and entangled love affairs are publicly exposed.

(In Spanish, without subtitles)

Wednesday, April 10, 6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series
The U.S. and Mexico:
Redefining the Relationship

Panel Discussion
"The U.S. and Mexico: Neighbors in a New Era"

A discussion featuring:

Sergio Aguayo
A founding member of the Mexican Academy of Human Rights, Professor Aguayo teaches in the Center for International Relations at El Colegio de México.

Denise Dresser
A columnist for Reforma and Proceso in Mexico City, Professor Dresser teaches in the political science department at Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México (ITAM).

Antonio R. Villaraigosa
California Assembly Speaker Emeritus and a former Los Angeles mayoral candidate, Mr. Villaraigosa is a distinguished fellow at the Southern California Studies Center at the University of Southern California.

Profile of Antonio Villaraigosa (Berkeley Magazine, 1999)
• Sergio Aguayo: Democracy in Mexico (from Journal of American History, 1999)
• Denise Dresser: Mexico: From PRI Predominance to Divided Democracy (paper presented at the Center for Latin American Studies, November 2001)

Friday, April 12, 4:00 p.m.
Room 160, Kroeber Hall

Analysis and photos from the event


Art Opening
Sylvia and Stephen Sharnoff, "Lichens of Baja California: The Fringe of the Sonoran Desert"

Photographs by Sylvia and Stephen Sharnoff

For gallery hours, please call us at (510) 642-2088

Join us for the opening reception:

Monday, April 15, 6:00-8:00 p.m.
CLAS Second Floor, 2334 Bowditch Street

Gallery and Description of the Exhibit
Photos from the Art Opening


Prof. Marcela Hernández Romo
"Productive Restructuring and Business Culture in Mexico"

Starting with the crisis of 1982 and the new transition of the global economy, businesses implemented a productive global restructuring. Mexico took part in this process although in a different form. In Mexico, restructuring has been uneven and heterogeneous. On the decision of elaborating business strategies for modernization, not only have structural pressures (such as the market) come into play but also other factors have intervened such as cultural aspects that entail a system of meaning and the relationship of power that is restructured (reinterpreted) in a hierarchical manner by employers generating different lines of action. The identification of these cultural codes, like labor ethics, solidarity, distrust, national wealth among others permit a broader understanding of business practices within a social, cultural, religious and economic context specific to Mexico.

Professor Hernández Romo is the coordinator of the master's program in Industrial Sociology and Labor at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes, Mexico. She is a currently a visiting scholar at the Center for Latin American Studies at UC Berkeley.

(presentation in Spanish)

Wednesday, April 17, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photo of the event


Series
The U.S. and Mexico:
Redefining the Relationship

Professor Sergio Aguayo
"Mexico at the Crossroads: An Evaluation of the Fox Administration"

A professor at El Colegio de México's Center for International Relations, Sergio Aguayo is a leading expert and commentator on human rights in Mexico. Aguayo has been actively involved in the promotion of democracy and human rights through organizations such as Civic Alliance and the Mexican Academy of Human Rights.

Thursday, April 18, 5:30 p.m.
Parlor, Women's Faculty Club

Analysis and photo of the event


Prof. Ramon Grosfoguel
"Coloniality of Power, Caribbean Migration, Global Cities and Radical Statehood for Puerto Rico"

A Conversation in the Caribbean Studies Group.

The Caribbean Studies Group is an interdisciplinary organization of students committed to providing a forum for the study of the Caribbean as a "space," and to creating a cohesive and coherent community of scholars with interest in the Caribbean. For more information, contact caribbean@socrates.berkeley.edu.

Friday, April 19, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos and summary of the event


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Daniel Kovalik
"Colombia, Human Rights, and U.S. Courts"

Daniel Kovalik is Assistant General Counsel of the United Steelworkers of America and one of the chief counsels for the plaintiffs in the Alien Tort Claims Act ("ATCA") cases against Coca-Cola and Drummond Coal. He spoke about these cases and the attempt to confront human rights abuses in Colombia through litigation in the U.S. courts.

• Read about Mr. Kovalik's participation in the ATCA case vs. Coca-Cola

Thursday, April 25, 12:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Colombia 2002

Professor Marco Palacios
"Knowledge Is Power: The Case of Colombian Economists"

Marco Palacios is a professor in the Latin American history department at El Colegio de México and the former Chancellor of the Universidad Nacional. He has published extensively on issues of violence, economic history, and populist movement. Professor Palacio is author of the classic account of Colombian history, Coffee in Colombia.

SEÑALES DE MARCO PALACIOS ANTE LA FRONTERA COLOMBO-VENEZOLANA, an interview in Spanish with Professor Palacios from Verbigracia

Thursday, April 25, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Dr. Carmina Brittain
"Transnational Messages: Experiences of Mexican Immigrant Children in American Public Schools"

Dr. Brittain is a Visiting Lecturer at the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley. Her research interests include immigrant children's adaptation in American schools, socio-cultural studies in education, and urban education. She is the author of Transnational Messages: Experiences of Chinese and Mexican Immigrants in American Schools.

Monday, April 29, 12:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photo of the event


Series
Brazil: Culture, Society and Politics

THE CENTER FOR LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES, with the Brazilian Ministry of Culture, is proud to present a celebration of

Mário de Andrade
THE INAUGURATION OF THE MÁRIO DE ANDRADE CHAIR IN BRAZILIAN CULTURE

With a lecture by

Benedito Nunes, Professor Emeritus of Philosophy, Universidade Federal do Pará

"Poesia e filosofia" (Lecture in Portuguese)
Professor Nunes is one of Latin America's most eminent philosophers and literary critics. He has published more than ten books about subjects ranging from narrative theory and modernist poetry to the interface between philosophy and literature. His publications include O dorso do tigre and O tempo na narrativa.

And a Selection of Brazilian Music, including the songs of Heitor Villa Lobos, performed by Ricardo Peixoto and Claudia Villela

• An analysis in Portuguese of Professor Nunes' book, Crivo de Papel (from Caderno de Sábado, 1998)

Tuesday, April 30, 2002, 4:00 p.m.
Seaborg Room, Faculty Club

Photos of the event


Carlos F. Chamorro
"Media and Power in Central America"

What happened to the media after the end of the civil war in Nicaragua and El Salvador? How has the media developed in other Central American countries? These questions are examined in a new documentary by Carlos Chamorro, who will also be on hand for a discussion of these issues after the film has been shown.

Journalist Carlos F. Chamorro is currently editor of Confidencial, a Nicaraguan weekly, and is the host and director of Esta Semana, a weekly Sunday night television magazine. From 1980 to 1994, he was the editor-in-chief of the Sandanista newspaper La Barricada.

Interview with Mr. Chamorro (from the Langara Journalism Review, 1999)
• The website for Confidencial, Mr. Chamorro' weekly newsmagazine (in Spanish)

(film in Spanish, with English subtitles)

Co-sponsored with the Graduate School of Journalism

Wednesday, May 8, 2002, 7:00 p.m.
Room 105, North Gate Hall (map)

Analysis of the event


Professor Jeffrey Lesser
"Negotiating National Identity: Immigrants, Minorities and the Struggle for Ethnicity in Brazil"

Jeffrey Lesser is Professor of History and Director of the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program at Emory University. He is currently the Fulbright Professor of History at the Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.

Websites constructed in Prof. Lesser's classes, reflecting his research:
Nikkei Identity in Oizumi, Japan
The Mexican Immigrant Community in Atlanta

Co-sponsored with the UC Berkeley Center for Japanese Studies

Thursday, May 9, 2002, 4:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Professor Guillermo O'Donnell
"Some Thoughts on New Democracies and the Rule of Law"

Guillermo O'Donnell is the Helen Kellog Professor of Government and International Studies at the University of Notre Dame. He has served as Academic Director of the Kellogg Institute for International Studies and President of the International Political Science Association. Among his numerous publications are, Modernization and Bureaucratic-Authoritarianism, A Democracia no Brasil, and Transitions from Authoritarian Rule.

Paper on Horizontal Accountability by Professor O'Donnell (from the website of the Kellogg Institute of International Studies)

(Co-sponsored with Center for the Study of Law and Society)

Friday, May 10, 2002, 12:10 p.m.
Center for the Study of Law and Society, 2240 Piedmont Ave (map)

Analysis and photos of the event


 

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