SPRING 2003 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

January | February | March | April | May

Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Walter Belik
"Brazil: New Proposals to Banish Hunger"

Walter Belik is Assistant Professor of Economics at the State University of Campinas (Unicamp), São Paulo, Brazil. He is the coordinator of the Food and Nutrition Research Unit at Unicamp and one of the coordinators of the Zero Hunger Project, adopted as priority by the new elected Brazilian president, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.

-Projeto Fome Zero/Zero Hunger project description (Acrobat .pdf file)
-Professor Belik's Powerpoint presentation

Tuesday, January 28, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos from the event


Series
Cine Documental

Film Presentation, “Señorita Extraviada”
Director: Lourdes Portillo

Lourdes Portillo is an accomplished writer, film director, and producer. She has worked in a richly varied range of forms, from television documentary to satirical video-film collage. Portillo’s film,“Señorita Extraviada”, investigates the crime wave in Juarez, México that has left more than 270 young women dead since 1993. Her exploration of the topic brings to light the courage of the women’s families as well as the corruption and chaos of this border town where these crimes are allowed to take place.

Ms. Portillo will present her film and answer questions.

See Ms. Portillo's website

Co-sponsored with the School of Journalism

Wednesday, January 29, 6:30-9:30 p.m.
Room 105, North Gate Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos from the event


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Paulo Paiva
“Challenges Facing the New Brazilian Government”

Mr. Paiva is the Vice President of the Inter American Development Bank (IADB). Previously he served as Brazil’s Minister of Planning and Budget (1998-1999) and Minister of Labor (1995-1998). He has published several articles in the area of population, labor market developments and, more recently, on development in Latin America.

-Mr. Paiva's Powerpoint presentation
-Mr. Paiva's biography

Friday, January 31, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos from the event


Tinker Summer Research Symposium

This two-day symposium is a unique opportunity to learn from the current research of UC Berkeley graduate students.

Thursday, February 6, 2:00-5:00 p.m. and
Friday, February 7, 2:00-5:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Thomas Holloway
“The Persistence of ‘Dependency’ as a Useful Framework for Understanding Latin America”

Thomas Holloway is Director of the Hemispheric Institute on the Americas and Professor of Latin American History at UC Davis. He is immediate past president of the Latin American Studies Association, and currently serves as Executive Secretary of the Conference on Latin American History. Professor Holloway’s main research field is the social history of Brazil in the National Period. His major works include Immigrants on the Land: Coffee and Society in São Paulo, 1886-1934 (Chapel Hill, 1980) and Policing Rio de Janeiro: Repression and Resistance in a 19th-Century City (Stanford, 1993).

Monday, February 10, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
US-Mexico Futures Forum

"The U.S. and Mexico: Problems and Prospects"

A discussion featuring:

- Harley Shaiken Professor of Geography and Education and Chair of the Center for Latin American Studies, UC Berkeley. Prof. Shaiken specializes in issues of work, technology and global production. He is the author of three books: Work Transformed :Automation and Labor in the Computer Age; Automation and Global Production; and Mexico in the Global Economy, as well as numerous articles and reports.

- Rafael Fernández de Castro, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Department of International Studies at the Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México. Prof. Fernández de Castro specializes in U.S.-Mexico relations, NAFTA, trade policy, and Mexican public policy. He is the author of The U.S. Congress: The Controversial Pivot of North America with Robert Pastor; U.S.-Mexico: The New Agenda (editor), and ¿Qué son los Estados Unidos?.

Wednesday, February 12, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Tinker Summer Research Presentations

- Joseph Sutton, "Grassroots Development in Candeal de Brotas, Brazil"
- Allison Davenport, "Cross-Border Migration Advocacy"
- Luis Carlos Monterrosa, "The Displaced People of Colombia"

Friday, February 21, 2:00-3:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Stephen Haber
“Political Institutions and Economic Development: Lessons from the Economic Histories of Brazil, Mexico, and the United States”

Stephen Haber is the A.A. and Jeanne Welch Milligan Professor of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, where he teaches political science and history. He is also Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow of the Hoover Institution, Senior Fellow of Stanford's Center for International Development, and Director of the Social Science History Institute. Prof. Haber’s most recent book, The Politics of Property Rights: Political Instability, Credible Commitments, and Economic Growth in Mexico, 1876-1929 (co-authored with Armando Razo and Noel Maurer) will be released from Cambridge University Press in May 2003.

Monday, February 24, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Film Presentation, "Enemies of War"

This documentary tells the story of the murder of six Jesuit priests, their housekeeper, and the housekeeper's teenage daughter during El Salvador's Civil War. Dr. Beatriz Manz, Professor of Geography and Ethnic Studies, will be present to discuss the history and politics of El Salvador. A Salvadorian priest and a refugee-immigrant will also be present to relate their stories.

Co-sponsored by the Institute of International Studies, the Center of Social Justice at Boalt Law School, the East Bay Sanctuary, and the Berkeley International Development Group.


Monday, February 24, 7:00-9:00 p.m.
Home Room, International House, 2299 Piedmont Avenue (map)

Photos of the event


Guatemalan Youth: Creating a Culture of Resistance
Speaking Tour

Jennifer Waleska Coguox Barrios is a young mother and member of Iqui Balam, a popular youth theater group from Guatemala City that creatively addresses social and political issues through theater, dance and hip hop music. Rogelio Hernández is a teacher and the secretary of the board of directors of the Student Association of Santa Maria Tzejá, a scholarship organization formed by indigenous youth from returned refugee communities in the Ixcan, Guatemala. Both guests will share their experience of community organization, resistance and cultural survival in times of globalization, state violence and community displacement.

This tour is an attempt to make connections for a future delegation of Guatemalan youth to travel to the Bay Area to participate in a cultural and political exchange.

(Presentation in Spanish, with English translation)

Tuesday, February 25, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Cine Documental

The Last Zapatistas: Forgotten Heroes (Los Ultimos Zapatistas: Heroes Olvidados)
Director: Francesco Taboada Tabone

“The Last Zapatistas” is the chilling testimony of the soldiers who fought beside their General Emiliano Zapata in the 1910 Mexican Revolution. Almost one hundred years later, the Mexican filmmaker Francesco Taboada discovered the last twelve survivors of the legendary Liberation Army of the South. They reveal a truth not to be found in any book. They speak of the failure of the Revolution, of the agrarian and ecological disaster threatening their country and of imminent civil war if the Zapatista ideals they represent continue to be ignored. 70 minutes, 2001.

Wednesday, February 26, 6:00-8:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Colombia 2003

Luis Garzón
“A Critical Look at the Uribe Government”

Luis Garzón was the president of Colombia’s largest labor federation, the CUT (Confederación Unitaria de Trabajadores), from 1996-2001. He was a presidential candidate in 2002 for the new party, Polo Democrático, and won the largest support a third-party candidate has ever received in the history of Colombia. Currently, he is a key figure in the peace process, serving as a member of the Executive Committee of the National Peace Council.

Thursday, February 27, 4:00-5:30 p.m.
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


International Money Laundering From Latin America to Asia: Who Pays?

The 2003 Stefan A. Riesenfeld Symposium Conference will address drug and weapons trafficking in Latin America, and the money laundering schemes which go hand in hand with them. Additionally, the conference will look at new democracies in Asia and Eastern Europe, and in particular, at their lucrative trade in women. The symposium will also address current measures dealing with money laundering, like the Patriot Act and "know your client" rules, as well as the potential for better measures and resolutions.

Keynote Speaker: Ambassador Adolfo Aguilar Zinser, the Permanent Representative of Mexico to the United
Nations and a member of the Security Council

-photos of Ambassador Aguilar Zinser's visit

Co-sponsored by the Berkeley Journal of International Law, the Boalt Hall Student Association, the UC Berkeley Graduate Assembly, the Boalt Hall Dean of Student Services and the Dean of Boalt Hall School of Law.

Conference Agenda


Friday, February 28, 2:00-7:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 1, 8:00 am- 6:00 p.m.
Booth Auditorium, Boalt Hall School of Law
(map)


Series:
US-Mexico Futures Forum

Lorenzo Meyer
"The Consolidation of Mexico's New Regime: The Beginning"

Lorenzo Meyer teaches in the International Studies Department at the Colegio de México in Mexico City, where he also directed the U.S.-Mexican Studies Program. He will be teaching a seminar at CLAS from late February to late March entitled "The U.S. and Mexico: Conflicting Agendas. A View of the Present from an Historical Perspective." Prof. Meyer is the author of eleven books on contemporary Mexico and U.S.-Mexico issues.

Wednesday, March 5, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Lounge, Women’s Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis and photo of the event


Series:
Colombia 2003

Álvaro Mutis
Public Reading and Conversation

Álvaro Mutis is one of Latin America most prominent poets and novelists. He has won countless awards including the Colombian National Literature Prize (1983) and the prestigious Prix Médicis Étranger (1989). Mutis, who produces an average of one book a year, is author of Abdul Bashur, soñador de navío (1991), The Adventures of Maqroll: Four Novellas (1995), and many poems.

Websites featuring Mr. Mutis can be found here and here

Mr. Mutis' visit has had to be postponed until Fall 2003.


Series:
US-Mexico Futures Forum

Albert Fishlow
"Mexican Development in the Long Term: Is NAFTA Sufficient?"

Professor Albert Fishlow teaches at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs. Previously Dr. Fishlow was Professor of Economics at the University of California, Berkeley and Dean of International and Area Studies. He served as Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for Inter-American Affairs from 1975 to 1976.

Thursday, March 13, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Lounge, Women’s Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Chappell Lawson
“Is There Public Opinion in Mexico?”

Chappell Lawson is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he holds the Class of 1954 Career Development Chair. His recent book, Building the Fourth Estate, addresses the role of the mass media in democratization, and his current research focuses on voting behavior in Mexico.

Monday, March 17, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Confict, Memory and Transitions

Charles Hale
“Activist Research v. Cultural Critique:
Law, Anthropology and Black / Indigenous Land Rights Struggles in Neoliberal Central America”

Charles Hale is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Associate Director of the Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. He has received research fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Social Science Research Council (SSRC) and the National Endowment for the Humanities. He is author of Resistance and Contradiction: Miskitu Indians and the Nicaraguan State, 1894-1987 (1994) and co-editor (with Jeffrey Gould and Darío Euraque) of Memorias del Mestizaje: Cultura y Política en Centroamérica, 1920 al Presente (forthcoming).

Co-sponsored by the Department of Anthropology

Monday, March 17, 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Room 575, McCone Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Colombia 2003

Nancy Appelbaum
"Competing Histories: Local Narratives of Race and Place in Colombia"

Nancy Appelbaum is Assistant Professor of History and Latin American Studies at the State University of New York at Binghamton. Her research interests include Latin America, Colombia, race, and gender. Of her many publications, her most recent book, Muddied Waters: Race, Region, and Local History in Colombia, will be released from Duke University Press in spring 2003.

Wednesday, March 19, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Confict, Memory and Transitions

Amy Ross
"The Myrna Mack Case"

Amy Ross is Assistant Professor of Geography at the University of Georgia. Her research interests include the spatiality of violence, geographies of justice, international institutions and the global civil society. Her book, The Body of the Truth: Truth Commissions in Guatemala and South Africa, is forthcoming.

Monday, March 31, 12:00-2:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photo of the event


Series
Cine Documental

The Yidishe Gauchos
Director: Mark Freeman

This intriguing documentary tells the nearly forgotten tale of how Jewish immigrants to Argentina became a part of that country’s ranching culture. These immigrants built schools, libraries, theaters and agricultural cooperatives in the wilderness. 30 minutes, 1995.

Ghosts in Patagonia (Fantasmas en la Patagonia)
Director: Claudio Remedi

In Sierra Grande, a town in Argentina’s Patagonia, the government decreed the closure of the iron mine, the town’s principle source of income. This documentary illustrates the personal stories of inhabitants as they relate their community’s decay from unemployment. In this isolated town a few people survive, struggling against unemployment and its social consequences. 84 minutes, 1996.

Wednesday, April 2 6:00-8:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
US-Mexico Futures Forum

David Bonior
"
NAPU and You: The North American Parliamentary Union-
What It Is and Why We Need It"

"The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is the constitution of the North American Common Market. It recognizes only one form of citizenship — that of multinational corporations. The North American Parliamentary Union (NAPU) is a democratic structure which will enfranchise citizens, farmers, laborers, small business people and environmentalists in the NAFTA countries as well as Central America. It will broaden the playing field so that our best democratic values will be incorporated into our social, economic and political decisions."

David E. Bonior was elected to the 10th Congressional District of Michigan in 1976. From 1991-2002, Congressman Bonior was the Democratic Whip, the second in command in the House Democratic Leadership. Throughout his political career, Congressman Bonior made it a priority to work on a wide range of issues, including fair trade, issues affecting women, improvement of the education system, health care coverage for all, the environment, civil and human rights, and election reform. He currently is a Professor in the College of Urban, Labor & Metropolitan Affairs, Wayne State University.

Thursday, April 3, 2003, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Maude Fife Room (Room 315), Wheeler Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


David Bonior
“U.S. and Iraq: Implications for the Americas”

David E. Bonior was elected to the 10th Congressional District of Michigan in 1976. From 1991-2002, Congressman Bonior was the Democratic Whip, the second in command in the House Democratic Leadership. In September of 2002, Congressman Bonior led the last congressional delegation to Iraq to assess the humanitarian situation and encourage both the Iraqi and the U.S. administrations to give the return of the weapons inspectors a chance.

Friday, April 4, 12:00 p.m.
Room 575, McCone Hall


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Vinod Aggarwal
“The Strategic Dynamics of Latin American Trade”

Vinod Aggarwal is Professor in the Department of Political Science, Affiliated Professor of Business and Public Policy in the Haas School of Business, and Director of the Berkeley Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Study Center (BASC) at the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Aggarwal has been a consultant to the Mexican Government, the U.S. Department of Commerce, OECD, the Group of Thirty, and the World Bank. Professor Aggarwal will present with Ralph H. Espach, a doctoral student in political science.

Monday, April 7, 12:00-1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
US-Mexico Futures Forum

Rosario Robles
"Mexicans Abroad: The Right to Vote and to Live With Dignity"

Rosario Robles Berlanga is the President of the Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD) and was the Mayor of Mexico City from 1999-2000. She also served on the executive committee of the workers' union at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México from 1988-1993.

DUE TO POLITICAL CHANGES, MS. ROBLES HAS HAD TO POSTPONE HER PRESENTATION. WE HOPE TO RESCHEDULE HER VISIT IN THE FALL. PLEASE CHECK BACK TO THIS SITE FOR UPDATES.


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas


William Mendoza Gomez
"
Stopping the Coca-Cola Murders: Meet Union Leaders on the Front Lines of the World’s Deadliest Labor Struggle"

William Mendoza Gomez is a prominent human rights advocate and president of the Coca-Cola workers’ union in Barrancabermeja, Colombia. Since 1994, eight workers and union activists from Coca-Cola plants in Colombia have been murdered by anti-union paramilitary groups. Mendoza, and colleague, Hector Rivera, will speak about their efforts to win justice for workers in one of the world’s most turbulent and dangerous regions.

Sponsored by: UC Berkeley Labor Center, UC Berkeley Center for Latin American Studies, Global Exchange, Corp Watch, Sweatshop Watch, Amazon Watch, Students Organizing for Justice in the Americas, Colombia Support Network and Plumbers and Fitters Local 393

Thursday, April 10, 7:00 p.m.
Institute of Industrial Relations, 2521 Channing Way


Enrique V. Iglesias

Enrique V. Iglesias is president of the Inter-American Development Bank (IBD). Prior to his election as president of the IDB, Mr. Iglesias was Uruguay’s Minister of Foreign Relations, (1985-1988) and the Executive Secretary of the U.N. Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean, ECLAC (1972-1985). He has written numerous articles and papers on Latin American and Uruguayan economic issues, capital markets, external financing and multilateralism.

Mr. Iglesias' biography

Postponed until Fall 2003


Anibal Quijano
"Coloniality and the Equality of Unequals"

Anibal Quijano is the Director of the Center of Social Research in Lima, Peru.

Co-sponsored with the Chicano-Latino Studies Program, Dean's Office of Social Sciences, and the Ethnic Studies Department.


Tuesday, April 15, 5:00 p.m.
Room 100, Genetics and Plant Biology Hall (GPB)


The Past, Present and Future of the Venezuelan Crisis 

A panel discussion featuring:

-Heinz Sonntag, Professor of Sociology, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas
-Edgardo Lander, Professor of Social Sciences, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas

Moderated by:
Ramon Grosfoguel, Department of Ethnic Studies

Wednesday, April 16, 4:00 p.m.
Ida Sproul Room, International House
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


"Caribbean Identity: A Work of Fiction?" Conference

Co-sponsored with the Caribbean Studies Working Group

Readings by the authors and Keynote Speech by Jose Saldivar

Thursday, April 17, 8:00 p.m.
Room 100, Genetics and Plant Biology building (GPB)

A panel discussion featuring:
- Edwidge Danticat, Haitian-American writer and 1995 finalist for the National Book Award for "krik?krack!"
- Junot Diaz, Dominican-American writer and 1997 nominee for the Quality Paperback "New Voices" award
- Natasha Tinsley, Graduate Student, Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley
- Percy Hintzen, Professor and Chair, African American Studies, UC Berkeley

Friday, April 18, 11:00 a.m.
Lipman Room, 8th floor of Barrows Hall

Workshops featuring the artists and their works

Friday, April 18, 2:00 p.m.
Room 88, Dwinelle Hall


Angel Quintero
"Maroon Ethnicities: Music, Dance and Cultural Politics in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean"
 

Angel Quintero is Director of the Center for Social Research at the University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras.

Co-sponsored with: the Department of African American Studies; the Department of Ethnic Studies; and the Townsend Center for the Humanities

Friday, April 18, 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.
Barbara Christian Conference Room
5th floor, Barrows Hall
(map)


New Contribution to Chilean Literature
Teresa Stojkov
“Jorge Teillier: Poet of the Hearth: A Reading”

Teresa Stojkov is Vice Chair of the Center for Latin American Studies at UC Berkeley. Her reading will be followed by a question and answer session with remarks by Ignacio Navarrette, Gwen Kirkpatrick, Estelle Tarica and Carlos Delgado. A light reception will follow the presentation.

-Reviews of the book

-Essay on related topic by Dr. Stojkov

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Library

Tuesday, April 22, 4:00 p.m.
Room 5125, Dwinelle Hall (Level E)



Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Antonio Barros de Castro
"Brazil in Transition"

Professor Barros de Castro teaches at the Institute of Economics of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ) and has been a visiting professor at the Center for Latin American Studies. Professor Barros de Castro is an expert on Brazilian industrial and trade policy, having directed BNDES, Brazil's giant development bank, which has a loan volume greater than the World Bank's.

Wednesday, April 23, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
US-Mexico Futures Forum

Latinos and the Political Process

A discussion featuring:

- Maria Echaveste, attorney and consultant in Washington D.C. MS. Echaveste served as Deputy Chief of Staff in the Clinton White House, from 1998 to 2000. Upon leaving government service, she formed her own consulting firm, the Nueva Vista Group, focusing on public policy, strategy and advocacy.

-Article from Horizon Magazine, about Ms. Echaveste's role in the Clinton White House

Thursday, April 24, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Home Room, International House (map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Peter H. Smith
“Cycles and Shapes of Democracy in Latin America”

Peter H. Smith is a professor of political science and the Simón Bolivar Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of California, San Diego. His major publications include Labyrinths of Power: Political Recruitment in Twentieth-Century Mexico (1979), Modern Latin America (1984) and Talons of the Eagle: Dynamics of U.S–Latin American Relations (1996).

Friday, April 25, 12:30 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Charlie Kernaghan
“Ending the Race to the Bottom: The Struggle for Workers' Rights in the Global Economy”

Charlie Kernaghan is Executive Director of the National Labor Committee, an independent human rights organization. He is prominent in the labor movement for drawing attention to and helping correct the overseas labor practices of U.S. corporations.

The New York Times calls him “the labor movement’s mouse that roared.”

Friday, April 25, 4:00 p.m.
Room 575, McCone Hall
(map)

Photos of the event


Debra Castillo
“Myths of Origin: The Conquest of Mexico in Early U.S. Narrative”

Professor Debra Castillo teaches in the Department of Romance Studies and Comparative Literature at Cornell University and is the former director of Cornell’s Latin American Studies Program (1997-2000). Currently, she is a visiting scholar at Stanford.

A light reception will follow.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Monday, April 28, 4:00 p.m.
Room 5125, Dwinelle Hall (Spanish and Portuguese Department Library)


Series
Cine Documental

The Scorpion (Comparsa el Alacrán)
Director: Gloria Rolando

A homage to Santos Ramírez, who wrote the comparsa “El Alacrán” in 1938, this colorful program documents the Afro-Cuban tradition. First preformed by whites dressed in blackface in the early 1900s, Santos Ramírez transformed the Alacrán into the most famous African comparsa celebrated in Cuban carnival. 19 minutes, 1999.

Cauri: The Word of the Saint (Cauri: La Palabra del Santo)
Director: Luis Acevedo Fals

This film depicts the Santería religion and the magic of the “cauri”- shells used by Santería priests to translate messages from the orishas. The documentary also provides an explanation of each of the saints in this Afro-Cuban religion. 27 minutes, 1996.


Even Queen Isabel Dances the Danzón (Hasta la Reina Isabel Baila el Danzón)
Director: Luis Felipe Bernaza

This comic documentary examines the mixture of Hispanic and African traditions that permeates every aspect of Cuban life. It follows a spiritist who is visited from time to time by the spirit of Queen Isabel of Spain. The filmmaker attempts to speak with Queen Isabel through the medium to ask her questions about the Cuban people. Depicting the belief in the supernatural within the context of a socialist revolution, the film is a self-reflective satire of the island’s pervasive Afro-Cuban popular beliefs. 20 minutes, 1991.

Wednesday, April 30, 6:00-8:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Mercedes Roffé
“El pajaro de fuego”

Mercedes Roffé is an Argentine poet. She has written several books of poetry, including Mayan Definitions (1999) and Poetic Anthology (2000). Among other literary and academic distinctions, she was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship in Poetry in 2001.

She will be reading from El pajaro de fuego.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, and the Department of Comparative Literature

Thursday, May 1, 1:00 p.m.
Room 5125, Dwinelle Hall (Spanish and Portuguese Department Library)


Series:
US-Mexico Futures Forum

Robert Pastor
“North America: Vision or Illusion?”

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) dismantled barriers and nearly tripled trade and investment. However, it failed to address the development gap between Mexico and its northern neighbors, and it omitted any credible institutions to anticipate crises or shape a new partnership. Thus, instead of uniting to respond to Sept. 11 , old habits of U.S. unilateralism and Canadian and Mexican ambivalence prevailed, endangering further integration. We need to plan for the second decade of NAFTA by developing North American solutions to continental problems and opportunities.

Robert Pastor is Vice President of International Affairs and Professor of International Relations at American University, where he established and directs a new Center for North American Studies and a new Center for Democracy and Election Management. Professor Pastor was a fellow and founding director of the Latin American and Caribbean Program at the Carter Center from 1985-98. He has written 13 books, including Toward a North American Community: Lessons from the Old World for the New.

Thursday, May 1, 4:00 p.m.
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Jonathan Fox
“Rethinking Local Governance: Lessons From a Collaborative Research Project With the Oaxaca Indigenous Binational Front”

Jonathan Fox is Professor and Chair of the Department of Latin American and Latino Studies at UC Santa Cruz. He has published widely on the issues of democratization and the strengthening of civil society, particularly in Mexico. This research has been supported with grants from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Social Science Research Council, the Council on Foreign Relations, the Heinz Foundation, and the North-South Center. Of his many publications, he most recently co-edited Cross-Border Dialogues: Mexico-U.S. Social Movement Networking (.pdf file).

Articles by Professor Fox:
-"La relación recíproca entre la participación ciudadana y la rendición de cuentas: La experiencia de los fondos municipales en el México rural" (in Spanish, Acrobat .pdf file)
-"Los Fondos Municipales de Solidaridad y la participación comunitaria en Oaxaca" (in Spanish, Acrobat .pdf file)

Monday, May 5, 12:00- 1:00 p.m.
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos from the event


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Roberto Schwarz
“Misplaced Ideas: A Colloquium With Roberto Schwarz on Cultural Theory and the Peripheries of Capitalism”

A special seminar and colloquium discussion featuring:

-Introduction and opening remarks from Candace Slater, professor of Spanish and Portuguese and Director of the Townsend Center for the Humanities, UC Berkeley

-Opening discussion moderated by Neil Larsen, professor of comparative literature and Co-director of the Program in Critical Theory, UC Davis

-Presentation by Roberto Schwarz, professor of literary theory, University of Campinas, São Paulo. Professor Schwartz’s materialist interpretation of cultural history has produced many works of critical theory, spanning 25 years. His books include Um Mestre Na Periferia do Capitalismo: Machado de Assis (1990) and Misplaced Ideas: Essays on Brazilian Culture (1992).

Co-sponsored with: the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Department of English, the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, the Department of Comparative Literature, the Interdisciplinary Marxism Working Group, Spatial Theories/Spatial Practices and the Consortium on the Novel.

Monday, May 5, 4:00 p.m.
Geballe Room, Townsend Center, 220 Stephens Hall


Eduardo Posada Carbo
“Elections, Parties and State Formation in Latin America, 1850-1880”

Eduardo Posada Carbo is a columnist for El Tiempo, a major newspaper in Bogotá, Colombia. Dr. Posada Carbo is also a research associate for the Latin American Centre at St. Anthony’s College in Oxford, England, where he received his doctorate in modern history.

Wednesday, May 7, 4:00 p.m.
Room 3335, Dwinelle Hall


Graciela Montaldo
“Lo que queda de la nación: La multitud entre el estado y la industria cultural”

Professor Graciela Montaldo teaches literature and cultural studies at the Universidad Simón Bolívar in Caracas, Venzuela. Currently she is a visiting scholar at UC Davis.

A light reception will follow.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Thursday, May 8, 12:00 p.m.
Room 5125, Dwinelle Hall (Spanish and Portuguese Department Library)

 

CLAS Events
by semester

 
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