SPRING 2004 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

January | February | March | April | May

Art Opening
Andrés Ovalle, "The Unknown Land"

Andrés Ovalle is a visual artist known for exploring the relations between the intuitive knowledge of the primitive world and surrealism. Myths, fantasy and memory mingle in his work which is suffused with a yearning for the sublime.

Art Exhibit January 19 – May 7, 2004
For exhibit hours, please call us at (510) 642-2088.

Join us for the artist’s talk, followed by an opening reception.

Wednesday, January 21, 5:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos from the opening


Series:
The U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum
Event Series

Adolfo Aguilar Zinser
"Is The United Nations on the Brink? Unilateralism vs. Multilateralism and the Quest for World Peace and Security"

This lecture will analyze the current state of world affairs, paying particular attention to the U.S.-led war against terrorism and the role played by the UN and multilateral diplomacy. Drawing from his recent experience as Mexican ambassador to the UN, Mr. Aguilar will address issues including the quality of U.S. leadership in world affairs after 9/11, the dissenting role of U.S. friends and allies in the UN Security Council and the quest for UN reform.

Mr. Adolfo Aguilar Zinser recently served as Permanent Representative of Mexico to the UN (2002-03), representing his country at the Security Council during the critical past two years. After resigning his post on November 20, 2003, he joined the National Autonomous University of Mexico to resume teaching and to undertake a research projected on topics related to U.S. and Mexican affairs.

Thursday, January 22, 5:00 pm
Morrison Room, Doe Library

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Jorge Wilheim
"The São Paulo New Strategic Master Plan"

São Paulo, Brazil’s most important city and a global metropolis, is celebrating its 450th birthday. The São Paulo of today, a metropolitan area of more than 17 million, has come a long way since 1880 when it was a small town of 60,000. A true new-world city, with its mobile society and migrant culture, São Paulo is a thriving, cosmopolitan city with many dramatic problems to face, from the unfair distribution of income to high unemployment rates, from its public transport challenges to the drainage of its hilly urban site. The recently approved Strategic Master Plan and its new zoning regulations are a pragmatic answer to many of these problems. However, the Plan’s innovations caused contentious local debate and were not easily approved, because, as J.J. Rousseau said in the 18th century, “the public interest is not the same as the interest of everybody.”

Jorge Wilheim is a well-known architect who recently commemorated 50 years of professional practice. He is currently responsible for the Municipal Urban Planning Department of São Paulo, in the Workers Party local government and also holds the Rio Branco Chair in Brazilian Studies at UC Berkeley for Spring Semester 2004. The former Deputy Secretary-General of Habitat II, Jorge Wilheim has also been the country’s Secretary of State for Planning and for the Environment. His books include Fax: Messages from a near future and Projeto São Paulo.

-Interview with Jorge Wilheim on city planning in São Paulo (in Portuguese)
-"Melting Pots and Marketplaces": an article by Jorge Wilheim on the future of the city

Wednesday, February 4, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Kirsten Sehnbruch
"From the Quantity of Employment to the Quality of Employment:
An Application of Amartya Sen’s Capability Approach to the Chilean Labor Market"

Chile is often held up as a model for the developing world because its progress on market liberalization has led to high growth rates coupled with a sharp reduction in poverty. Chile’s flexible labor market in particular has been credited with contributing to growth and lowered unemployment rates. Most recently, Chile has pioneered alternatives to traditional unemployment benefits and subsidies by implementing a “privatized” unemployment insurance system. This presentation explores what is behind this model image and points out some of its flaws by means of a survey specifically designed to ask questions that other labor market surveys avoid.

Kirsten Sehnbruch has just completed her Ph.D. on the Chilean Labor Market at Cambridge University. She has spent the last five years researching the labor market in Chile and has worked as a consultant to the Chilean government on a range of issues related to the labor market, the new unemployment insurance and the pension system. She is now a visiting scholar at the Center for Latin American Studies.

-Draft of the paper on which the talk will be based (.pdf file)

Monday, February 9, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Cine Documental

The Other Francisco
Director: Sergio Giral (1974)

This critical adaptation of the 19th-century Cuban novel Francisco by Anselmo Suárez Romero deconstructs the novel to expose its racist assumptions. Giral’s retelling reveals the nature of slavery and class struggle in Cuba. Latin American film critic John Mraz observed that “to Giral, the overlooking of slave resistance by Suárez y Romero is the novel’s greatest shortcoming … Giral not only portrays slave resistance in escape and vandalism, but he also ends the movie with a montage of a rebellion and the official reaction to it. Slaves are seen burning cane fields and killing the mayoral and contramayoral, while the omniscient voice-over recounts the long tradition of slave revolt in 19th-century Cuba.”
100 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, February 11, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
The U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum
Event Series

Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de Leon
"Fostering or Frustrating Globalization, That Is the Question"

Ernesto Zedillo was President of Mexico from December 1994 to December 2000. He is now Co-Coordinator of the UN Millennium Development Goals Task Force on the Multilateral Trading System, Co-Chairman of the UN Commission on the Private Sector and Development and Co-Chairman of the International Commission on Global Public Goods. He is also Director of the Center for the Study of Globalization and Professor of International Economics and Politics at Yale University.

Co-sponsored by the Office of the Chancellor and the Robbins Collection of the School of Law, UC Berkeley.

Friday, February 13, 4:00 pm
Wheeler Auditorium, Wheeler Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Fernando Flores Labra
"Challenges for Chile: A Conversation with Senator Fernando Flores"

Fernando Flores

Since 2002, Senator Fernando Flores Labra has represented Chile's Tarapaca region. Previously, Senator Flores held several posts in the Allende government including: Minister of the Economy, Minister of Housing and Secretary-General of the Government. During the three years following the 1973 coup he was held as a political prisoner in Pinochet's concentration camps. Senator Flores received his Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies from UC Berkeley and is the author of many books, including Building Trust in Business, Politics, Relationships and Life, and Disclosing New Worlds.

-Senator Flores' official web page (in Spanish)

Tuesday, February 17, 12:00-1:30 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Diamela Eltit
"Chile: 30 Years after the Military Coup"

Diamela Eltit

Diamela Eltit is one of Latin America’s most daring and experimental writers and is highly regarded for her avant-garde initiatives in the world of letters. Author of nine novels, Eltit began her engagement with literature during the years of Pinochet rule when she participated in the neo-vanguard, staging art actions against the dictatorship, and published her first novels, Lumpérica (1983) and Por la patria (1986), to universal acclaim. She has been honored repeatedly by international literary organizations, among them the Modern Language Association in the United States and Casa de las Americas in Havana, which last year sponsored a week long conference on her work. She has also held posts as writer-in-residence at Brown, Yale, Washington University and Columbia and came to Berkeley several years ago as a Regents’ Lecturer.

-A discursive analysis of Ms. Eltit's work, "Diamela Eltit: A Gendered Politics of Writing" (.pdf file)

Wednesday, February 18, 4:00–5:30 pm
Note: Location changed to Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event

 
Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

Francisco Goldman
"The Bishop Gerardi Murder Case"

Since 1998, novelist Francisco Goldman has been reporting on the murder of the great human rights activist Bishop Juan Gerardi in Guatemala. To date, three military officers and a priest have been imprisoned for the crime, an unprecedented and still threatened conviction in Guatemala. Goldman’s particular emphasis has been on the young Church and human rights activists who carried out most of the investigation that led to the convictions.

Goldman’s journalism on the Bishop Gerardi case has been published in The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books; he will publish a book expanding on those pieces in 2005. His talk will be a first-hand, personal account.

Francisco Goldman is the author of two award-winning novels: The Long Night of White Chickens and The Ordinary. His novels have been published in 10 languages. In 2005 will publish a book, also with Grove, on the Bishop Gerardi murder case in Guatemala.

-An interview with Francisco Goldman from PIF Magazine

Monday, February 23, 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

Analysis and photos of the event


Jorge Arrate
"The Chilean Popular Movement: Historical Overview and Future Perspectives"

Jorge Arrate
Professor Arrate will examine the main milestones in the history of the Chilean Popular Movement — made up of leftist groups, unions and social organizations — after the foundation of the “Sociedad de la Igualdad” in 1848. He will analyze the characteristics of its development, in particular the relationship between political parties and social organizations, the role of theory in the formation of the ideological framework of the Chilean Left and the cultural impact of the Popular Movement. The significance of Recabarren and Allende, the Popular Unity coalition, the fight against the dictatorship and the transition to democracy will also be addressed. The lecture will end with an analysis of the current situation in Chile and likely future developments.

Jorge Arrate has been a faculty member at the University of Chile, the University of Santiago, Catholic University of Chile and UC Berkeley. He was a Minister in the Allende, Aylwin and Frei administrations and the Ambassador of Chile to Argentina during the Lagos government. Currently, he is the President of the Board of the University of Arts and Social Sciences (ARCIS) in Santiago, Chile.

Wednesday, February 25, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil
Paulo Lins
"Cidade de Deus/City of God"

Paulo Lins holds the Mario de Andrade Chair in Brazilian Culture at The Center for Latin American Studies at UC Berkeley. He is the celebrated author of Cidade de Deus (City of God), first published in 1997 and recently made into an acclaimed movie of the same name.

Mr. Lins book was based on "10 years of research and 30 years of life experience" in the Cidade de Deus housing project in Rio de Janeiro and is as much a memoir as a novel.

-A short interview with Mr. Lins, from Hispanic News

co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Thursday, March 4, 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Natalia Brizuela
"Photography, Melancholy and the Conception of Brazilian Nationalism"

The Empire of Brazil’s passage toward progress and modernity is reflected in the photographic and literary production of the second half of the 19th century. In this talk, Prof. Brizuela will explore the relationship between 19th century Brazilian nationalism and melancholy by mapping the historical, political and theoretical geographies of the photography and literature of the period.

Natalia Brizuela recently joined the Department of Spanish & Portuguese at UC Berkeley after completing her Ph.D. at New York University where she worked on the relationship between politics and aesthetics in Argentina and Chile. Her research focuses on literary and visual cultures in the Southern cone and Brazil and their relationship to state formations.

Monday, March 8, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Carol A. Smith
"Indigenous Movements in Guatemala and Ecuador:
Different Histories, Different Social Contexts, Different Strategies?"

This talk will focus on the differences between the indigenous movements in “peaceful” Ecuador and “violent” Guatemala. Smith, who has studied both areas, will also comment on input she solicited from other specialists comparing the situation in Ecuador with that of other parts of Latin America where indigenous social movements are taking place. Key to Smith’s comparison is her challenge of the belief that the history of the Maya movement in Guatemala developed out of Guatemala’s period of violence in the 1980s.

Carol A. Smith is Professor and Chair of Anthropology at UC Davis. She has worked with the Maya of Guatemala in many different parts of the country for 30 years, concentrating on ethnic/class relations. Recently, her work has considered the nature of Guatemala’s Maya movement as it has shifted over time and space, race and racism in Guatemala and the intersection of race, class, and gender in Guatemala and other parts of Central America.

- Professor Smith's biography from the Department of Anthropology at UC Davis

Monday, March 15, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Summer Research Grantee Symposium

This two-day symposium is a unique opportunity to learn from the current research of UC Berkeley graduate students who spent last summer in Latin America.

Schedule of presentations

Tuesday, March 16, 2:00 – 5:00 pm and
Wednesday, March 17, 2:00 – 5:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Alfredo Palacio Gonzales
"Building a Social Network in Ecuador in the Era of Globalization"

Ecuador is made up of a patchwork of indigenous communities, people of colonial Spanish origin and descendants of African slaves. Vice President Palacio Gonzales will address the fact that not all these groups have reaped the benefits of the industrial boom after the discovery of large oil reserves in the 1960s. Additional steps to stabilize the economy, such as IMF-inspired austerity measures and privatization, have generated widespread unrest, primarily among the indigenous poor, who cannot afford increased fuel prices.

Alfredo Palacio Gonzales is the Vice President of Ecuador. During his time in office he has sought to stabilize the economy and build a social network after the turbulent end of the last century. He is the author of Hacia…Un Humanismo Científico and Incidencia de las Enfermedades Cardiovasculares en Hospitales de la Provincia del Guayas.

This event is free and open to the public. You may reserve your seat in advance by calling 510-642-9460 with your name, number of seats, phone number and/or e-mail address or email the information to ihprogra@berkeley.edu.

- Vice President Palacio Gonzales' official biography (in Spanish)

Co-sponsored by the International House, Consulate General of Ecuador, UC Berkeley International and Area Studies and the World Affairs Council of Northern California.

Wednesday, March 17, 7:00 pm
Auditorium, International House, 2299 Piedmont Avenue

Photos of the event


Series:
The U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum
Event Series

Mariclaire Acosta
"A Human Rights Policy for a Democratic Mexico"

Mariclaire Acosta is the former subsecretary for Human Rights and Democracy in the Secretariat of Foreign Relations Office in Mexico. Her career in the field of human rights has led her on missions ranging from investigating the treatment of immigrants in the United States to studying the effects of violence in Colombia. Currently she is a member of the Advisory Council on Foreign Relations for the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL). Ms. Acosta is the author of many articles including: “Overcoming Discrimination against Women in Mexico: A Task for Sisyphus,” “Lessons Learned from Relations between Mexican and U.S. Human Rights Organizations” and “Democracy, Governability and Human Rights in Mexico.”

-Article about Ms. Acosta's leaving the Mexican government from Human Rights Watch (August 2003)

Thursday, March 18, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club

Analysis and photos of the event


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Huberto Juárez Núñez
"Economía y Trabajo en México a una década del NAFTA"

La economía mexicana contiene dos segmentos muy diferenciados. El primero se asocia al mercado interno y el segundo produce para la exportación. Esta dicotomía puede explicar el bajo impacto en los beneficios esperados de acuerdos regionales como el NAFTA. El producto nacional no ha tenido períodos de crecimiento y estabilidad sostenidos. Entre otros resultados, variables como el empleo y los salarios tuvieron en los últimos diez años un promedio negativo. La desaceleración de la economía norteamericana ha hecho más evidente la dependencia en inversiones y exportaciones y, como resultado, en México tenemos tres años de atonía. En esta presentación se analizarán las características del ciclo económico mexicano, las industrias de exportación (especialmente la automotriz y las maquilas del vestido) y los resultados en empleos y salarios con un enfoque especial en el período 2001-2003.

Dr. Huberto Juárez Núñez is Professor of Economics at the Autonomous University of Puebla, Mexico.

This presentation will be given in Spanish.

Monday, March 29, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


José Luis Paz Soria
"Bolivian Archaeology and Nationalism"

In Bolivia, recent vindications of the indigenous villages are frequently ignored by the national archeology community. This neglect occurs because archeology is managed by a “scientific community” that responds to an urban-occidental vision of culture that prioritizes 1) the concept of a singular nation state rather than acknowledging the many nationalities that underlie the actual Bolivian territory, 2) the methodology used to obtain information to the detriment of the humane treatment that these villages deserve, and 3) debates in limited academic circles instead of engaging with the people who still hold these ancient cultural traditions.

José Luis Paz Soria is the director of the Kallamarka Archeological Project in La Paz, Bolivia. He has worked extensively with the Taraco Archeological Project directed by Professor Christine Hastorf, UC Berkeley. The majority of his publications deal with the study of the formative period in Bolivia.

Please note: This presentation will be in Spanish.

Moderated by Christine Hastorf, Professor of Anthropology

Co-sponsored with the Department of Anthropology

Tuesday, March 30, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Cine Documental

The Promised Ship
Director: Luciano Capelli (2000)
and

Jump Over the Atlantic
Director: María Eugenia Esparragoza (1990)

The Promised Ship
In the 1920s, Marcus Garvey, the leader of the early 20th century black power movement, founded a steamship line intended to transport black people back across the Atlantic to their ancestral homelands. In this documentary, the old townspeople of Limón, on the Caribbean coast of Costa Rica, recall the emotional impact this venture had on them and their parents, although it never came to fruition. The film also documents the United Fruit Company’s efforts to squelch Garvey’s organizing activities on the region’s banana plantations. 51 minutes.
English and Spanish with subtitles.

Jump Over the Atlantic
This film traces cultural similarities and continuities between a small Afro-Venezuelan settlement in Barlovento, on the coast of Venezuela, and the Belgian Congo in Africa, where people were captured and sold into slavery in the nineteenth century. By showing each group film footage of their brothers overseas, the film captures the opinions Venezuelans and Congolese have of one another. This cross-cultural ethnographic exercise shows that, long after their migration from Africa, Afro-Venezuelans retain many African practices. 30 minutes.
Spanish and French with English subtitles.

Wednesday, March 31, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Mark Alan Healey
"City of Rubble, Visions of Order: Architects, Powerbrokers and the Peronist State in the Remaking of San Juan, Argentina After the 1944 Earthquake"

The worst natural disaster in Argentine history, the 1944 San Juan earthquake,
was also the spark for a wide range of projects for dramatic transformation.
While the aid campaign for victims launched the career of Colonel Juan Peron,
the city in ruins inspired dramatic plans for rebuilding. This talk will trace
the intellectual origins, political contours and ultimate trajectory of
architectural attempts to use this opportunity to forge a model city for the
nation.

Trained as an architect and historian, Mark Healey recently arrived at
Berkeley after teaching at New York University and the University of
Mississippi. His work centers on the broad transformations of state authority,
social life and cultural forms in twentieth-century Latin America, especially
Argentina. This talk comes out of his current project, which explores these
themes in the unmaking and remaking of the city of San Juan after the 1944
earthquake.

-Two articles by Professor Healey from The American Prospect dealing with the Argentinian financial crisis of 2001-02, "Down, Argentine Way" and "The Costs of Orthodoxy"

Monday April 5, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Cristovam Buarque
Title to be announced

Cristovam Buarque is a Senator of the Republic in Brazil. He served as Minister of Education for the 2003 year term.

POSTPONED until Fall 2004


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Susanne Jonas
"Latino Immigrant Rights, Legalization Strategies and Citizenship in the Shadow of the National Security State: Responses to Domestic Preemptive Strikes"

In this talk, Prof. Jonas will address U.S. anti-immigrant measures since 1996 with a focus on the changes that have taken place since Sept. 11 and the passage of the “Patriot” Act(s). A comparison will be made between the measures that were already in place in 1996 and those that were created during the post-9/11 “national security” regime. The proactive efforts by the Latino immigrant communities to protect their rights will be examined. In conclusion, a theoretical link will be made between anti-immigrant measures and their opposite— i.e., the reconceptualization of citizenship and its implications for U.S. democracy.

Susanne Jonas teaches Latin American & Latino Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. She is Associate Chair of LALS, and coordinator of the “Latinos in California” Research Cluster of UCSC’s Chicano/Latino Research Center.

-An article by Professor Jonas from the Common Dreams website

Monday, April 12, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Colombia in Context
Floro Tunubalá
Floro Tunubalá
"Peace and Prosperity in Colombia? Indigenous and Grassroots Communities’ Response to Drugs and Warfare"

After more than forty years of armed conflict, and with increasing U.S. involvement in the war, Colombia is not often associated with peace. Yet grassroots campesino and indigenous communities in Colombia have been successfully resisting violence and sowing the seeds of alternative economic development. Floro Tunubalá will share stories from the front lines of this struggle for peace and prosperity in Colombia.

Floro Tunubalá served as Governor of Cauca in southwestern Colombia from 2001-03. The first indigenous leader ever to be elected governor in Colombia, Floro is a member of the Guambiano nation and a representative of one of the strongest social movements in Colombia, the indigenous and campesino movement of Cauca.

Event in Spanish, with English translation

-Interview with Mr. Tunubalá from the "Stop the Drug War" website

Co-sponsored with the Institute for International Studies, Students Organizing for Justice in the Americas, the Chibcha-Colombia Human Rights Information Committee, the Colombia Human Rights Network and Coordinación Colombia–Europa–EEUU.

Monday, April 12, 4:00 pm
Room 223, Moses Hall

Photo of the event


Series
Cine Documental

The Agronomist
Directed by Jonathan Demme (2004)

A long-cherished personal documentary project from Academy Award-winning director Jonathan Demme (The Silence of the Lambs and Philadelphia), The Agronomist is a celebration of an extraordinary man — journalist, broadcaster and human rights activist Jean Dominique — and his tireless fight against injustice and oppression in Haiti. Demme shot many hours of footage with Dominique over fifteen years. Their joint project was cut tragically short in April 2000 when, in the turmoil leading up to elections in Haiti, Jean Dominique was assassinated outside his radio station, Radio Haïti Inter. The Agronomist is a portrait of a remarkable man, his extraordinary wife and partner Michèle Montas and their beloved Haiti.

The Agronomist is being released at a time when Haiti is in turmoil. Headlines in our newspapers talk about a “cannibal army,” an upper class “revolutionary” opposition, a compromised President and a two-hundred year struggle for democracy. The Agronomist provides viewers with a context in which to understand what is happening in Haiti today — and what may happen tomorrow.

Please plan to arrive early. Seating is limited and not guaranteed. Theater is not responsible for overbooking. Doors open 30 minutes before show time.

Co-sponsored with the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

Monday, April 12, 7:00 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way


Series:
The U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum
Event Series

Sergio Aguayo
"Mexico’s 2006 Presidential Election: The Factors and Actors Involved

In 2006 Mexicans will elect a new president. Professor Aguayo will analyze the possibilities of the 17 contenders for the nomination and the tensions that competition is creating inside the different political parties. Open competition — normal in other democracies — is already exposing the strengths and weaknesses of Mexican institutions and social fabric. Professor Aguayo will discuss the possibility of free and fair elections in light of doubts about the impartiality of the new electoral authority and concerns about campaign financing.

Sergio Aguayo has been a Professor at the Colegio de México since 1977. He is an expert on security issues, U.S.–Mexico relations, the Mexican political system, refugees, democratization and human rights. In 2003 he was one of the four experts who wrote a report on Mexico’s human rights situation for the United Nations. Professor Aguayo is also active in the promotion of democracy and human rights through organizations such as Civic Alliance and the Mexican Academy of Human Rights. His weekly column appears in Reforma and 14 other Mexican newspapers, and he is a panelist on TV Channel 11’s weekly program Primer Plano.

Tuesday, April 13, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women’s Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Diaspora and Homeland Development Conference

The Diaspora and Homeland Development Conference is an initiative of the Berkeley Center for Globalization and Information Technology which aims to understand and promote the capacities of diaspora communities for economic development in their homelands. Contemporary diasporas, because of their skills, wealth and transnational networks, have become a new engine for cooperation between host-land and homeland.

A variety of researchers who have done work on diaspora–homeland economic cooperation ventures will be speaking. Countries to be discussed include Haiti, the Philippines, Mexico, Palestine, Morocco, India, Pakistan, Armenia, Iran and Nigeria.

-Website for the conference

Co-sponsored by the Institute of International Studies, the Center for Urban Ethnography, and the Institute of Governmental Studies.

Tuesday, April 13, 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Room 223, Moses Hall


Maxine Waters
"Perspectives on a Changing Haiti"

photo courtesy of and © Tino Soriano
Congresswoman Maxine Waters has represented California’s 35th District, which includes a large part of South Central Los Angeles and the Westchester community, for seven terms. Formerly the Chair of the 39-member Congressional Black Caucus (1997-98), Rep. Waters was recently named Co-Chair of the House Democratic Steering Committee. Rep. Waters was a key figure in Congressional efforts to restore Haiti’s democratically-elected President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to power in 1991. In early March, she testified before the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations on the role of the U.S. government in the overthrow of President Aristide.

-Congresswoman Waters' official website

Thursday, April 15, 7:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Adrian Hearn and Michael Spiro
"Sacred Allegiances: Decentralized Development and the Rhythm of Community Religion in Cuba"

When the Soviet Union collapsed in 1989, Cuba lost its main source of economic support and the capacity to maintain its centralized system of basic social services. As a result, neighborhood welfare projects began to emerge, built on the collaboration of decentralized state urban development institutions with community self-help groups. Projects designed to confront growing problems have benefited from the participation of Afro-Cuban religious leaders, who are respected figures at the neighborhood level.

This talk considers the spiritual basis for this respect, looking in particular at the fortification of community relationships through sacred ceremonial music.

Adrian H. Hearn is an associate lecturer in applied anthropology at La Trobe University, Melbourne, and a professional percussionist. His research in Senegal and Cuba has focused on the capacity of urban community-based organizations rooted in religious, musical and medicinal traditions to deliver social welfare services.

Michael Spiro is an internationally recognized percussionist, recording artist and educator, who specializes in Afro-Cuban and Brazilian musical forms.

Friday, April 16, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


photo courtesy of and © Tino Soriano
Jean Casimir
The Haitian Crisis in Historical Perspective (1804-2004)

Jean Casimir was the Haitian Ambassador to the United States from 1991-96. He played a key role in the negotiations to restore Haiti’s democratically-elected president, Jean-Bertrand Aristide, to power in 1991. He later broke with Aristide, and today is an important member of the democratic opposition.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Ethnic Studies.

Monday, April 19, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women’s Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Georgina Lagos
"Mexico & California: New Challenges for Consular Affairs"

Mexico’s foreign policy has undergone dramatic changes during President Vicente Fox’ administration. Strengthening the bilateral relation with the U.S. increased in importance, and consuls were granted greater diplomatic authority to work with the government and civil society in order to achieve this goal. Mexican immigration to the U.S. has been another area of concern, especially given the importance of the $12 billion a year in remittances immigrants send home to Mexico. Georgina Lagos will share her views on these and other issues facing the Mexico–California partnership.

Georgina Lagos was the first woman to serve as Consul General of Mexico in San Francisco (2001-04). Lagos played a key role in gaining official recognition for the Mexican Consular ID as a valid piece of identification for Mexican immigrants in many California cities.

Tuesday, April 20, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Cine Documental

The Forgotten Roots
Director: Rafael Rebollar (2001)
and
Candombe
Director: Mabel Maio (1999)

The Forgotten Roots
This impressive documentary details the history of Mexico’s often-overlooked African populations. Drawing on interviews and archival imagery, the film takes us from the slavery of the colonial era to today’s Afro-Mexican communities in Guerrero, Oaxaca, Campeche, Morelos and Veracruz. The Forgotten Roots argues that Mexico’s famous mestizaje includes the important contributions of African groups, as well as Spaniards and Indians. 50 minutes.
Spanish with English subtitles.

Candombe
This film gives a broad introduction to the history of Candombe and documents its pervasive influence in the Río de la Plata region of Uruguay. Touching on the region’s history of slavery and the historical development of Candombe from a marginal form to a widely accepted and appreciated musical genre, it includes interviews with Candombe pioneers Lágrima Ríos and Martha Gularte, as well as other historians, musicians and experts. 48 minutes.
Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, April 21, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Jaime Breilh
"Towards Emancipatory Intercultural Science: The New Agrarian Research System of Ecuador"

Dr. Breilh is a visiting professor at the Center for Iberian and Latin American Studies, UC San Diego. He is co-founder of the Latin American Social Medicine Association and Director of the Health Research Center (CEAS) in Quito. He will share his ideas for a North–South collaborative research and intervention program geared towards the construction of agrarian justice.

While he will talk briefly about his most recent research, this session will be framed as a discussion rather than a lecture.

Co-sponsored with the Institute of International Studies.

Monday, April 26, 12:00 pm
Room 223, Moses Hall


Rebecca Scott
"Building Citizenship on the Ruins of Slavery: Cuba and Louisiana in Comparative Perspective"

Rebecca Scott is a professor at the University of Michigan Law School, where she teaches a seminar on race, law, and citizenship in comparative perspective, and does research on slavery and the law. She began research in Cuban history in 1976, and was one of the first North American scholars to carry out research in national and local archives in the island of Cuba. In 1987 she and several colleagues founded the Postemancipation Societies Project, a collaborative research and teaching project that links faculty and graduate students at the University of Michigan, the University of Chicago, and the University of Maryland.

Wednesday, April 28, 4:00 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Joao Cayres
"Lula's First 18 Months: A Labor Perspective"


Joao Cayres is the Coordinator of the Representative Committee for the workers in the Ford Plant in Sao Bernadino, Sao Paulo and the former Director of the ABC Metalworkers Union.


Monday, May 3, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Never Again
Directed by Marta Rodríguez and Fernando Restrepo
(2001)

In the violent and complex conflict that has racked Colombia, it is always the most vulnerable who are the most affected. Nunca Mas presents the stories of Afro-Colombian peasants displaced from their land in the armed conflict between the Colombian army, Marxist guerillas and the right-wing paramilitary in the isolated province of the Chocó. 56 minutes.
Spanish with English subtitles.

Poppy: The Damned Flower
Directed by Marta Rodríguez
(1998)

This documentary illustrates the stark choice confronted by many rural Colombian communities: either grow opium poppies or face starvation. Indigenous farmers interviewed in the film characterize the cultivation of illegal crops as a social problem, calling for land reform, access to education and general alleviation of poverty. Yet the Colombian government’s response to the problem has been to use toxic herbicides that not only destroy opium fields, but also ruin subsistence crops and affect the rural population’s health. 30 minutes.
Spanish with English subtitles.

Marta Rodriguez has devoted her career to exposing human rights violations in her native Colombia, from her early, ground-breaking documentary on the families of brickmakers to her recent documentary on Colombia’s displaced. She will present at the screenings and hold a brief question and answer session after each of the films.

Wednesday, May 5, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


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