SPRING 2005 CALENDAR OF EVENTS


January
| February | March | April | May


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Evan Lieberman
“Institutions and Identities: Explaining the Policy Response to HIV/AIDS in Brazil and South Africa”

Evan Lieberman is Assistant Professor of Politics and faculty director of the Princeton AIDS Initiative at Princeton University. The author of Race and Regionalism in the Politics of Taxation in Brazil and South Africa (Cambridge University Press 2003), Prof. Lieberman is currently working on a study of the politics of AIDS around the world as well as on various projects concerned with comparative research methods.

-Professor Lieberman's homepage at Princeton
-Paper: "Taxation Data as Indicators of State-Society Relations: Possibilities and Pitfalls in Cross-National Research" (.pdf document)

Co-sponsored with the Department of Political Science.

Friday, January 21, 2:00 pm
Room 202, Barrows Hall

Photos of the event



Sebastián Zulueta
“Service Learning and the Development of Volunteerism in Chile”

Chile has undergone a series of transformations over the past 10 years as it has returned to democracy and experienced the effects of globalization and economic growth. As social responsibility has become more necessary, and consequently more ingrained in the culture, Chile has expanded its community volunteerism efforts. One outgrowth of this movement has been the advancement of the concept of service learning. Professor Zulueta will discuss how service learning structures can be created within Chile’s education system as well as the impact of volunteerism on Chilean society.

Sebastián Zulueta is director of the Service Learning Center at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile where he is also a professor in the Sociology Department. He holds graduate degrees in Business Administration and Sociology from the UC of Chile.

-Powerpoint presentation "Evolución del Voluntariado en Chile"

Co-sponsored with the Service-Learning Research and Development Center and International and Area Studies.

Monday, January 24, 12:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Current Issues and New Perspectives
in Latin American Law


Delia Revoredo Marsano
“The Jurisdiction of Peru’s Constitutional Court”

Justice Revoredo is one of three members of the Constitutional Court of Peru who voted against former President Alberto Fujimori’s plan to seek a third term in 1997. Congress immediately dismissed all three judges. In 1998, the government of Costa Rica granted Justice Revoredo political asylum and, in 2000, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights issued a protective order on her behalf. She and her colleagues were reinstated by Congress in 2000, after Fujimori’s departure.

-Justice Revoredo's official biography on the Constitutional Court of Peru website

Co-sponsored with the Boalt Hall School of Law. A presentation of the Robbins Collection Lectures in Political Culture and Legal Tradition.

Monday, January 24, 4:00 pm
Goldberg Room, Boalt Hall

Analysis of the event


Tino Soriano
“La Zafra—The Sugar Cane Harvest”

In La Zafra, on exhibit at the Center for Latin American Studies, photojournalist Tino Soriano focuses his lens on the plight of Haitians at work in the sugar cane fields of the Dominican Republic.

“The sugar with which we sweeten our lives also contains bitter ingredients: slavery, hunger, intolerable sanitary conditions and, above all, thousands of campesinos trapped in misery without the possibility of starting a new life.” — Tino Soriano

-Tino Soriano's website

Join us for the photographer’s talk, followed by an opening reception.

Wednesday, January 26, 5:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

For exhibit hours please call (510) 642-2088. On display January 26-May 31, 2005.

Photo of the event


Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

Carlos Castresana Fernández
“The Legacy of the Pinochet Case”

Judge Carlos Castresana Fernández serves in the Central Prosecution Service Against Corruption in the Attorney General’s Office in Spain. He authored the formal complaint and subsequent reports in “the Pinochet Case” which led to the arrest of former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet and his prosecution under international law. Judge Castresana is an expert in international legal cooperation and is currently a visiting professor at the University of San Francisco where he teaches International Criminal Law.

-BBC article on Pinochet's recent release on bail from house arrest in Chile, with links to other reporting on the case's history.

Thursday, January 27, 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

The Pinochet Case
Directed by Patricio Guzmán (2001)

Augusto Pinochet, the general who overthrew President Salvador Allende of Chile in 1973, was the first dictator in Latin America, or the world, to be prosecuted by the international justice system since the Nuremberg trials. This film investigates the legal origins of the case in Spain, where it began two years before Pinochet’s arrest in England. 109 minutes. English and Spanish with English subtitles.

“Sober political and legal analysis alternates with grim first-hand accounts of torture and murder in a film that has the structure of a choral symphony that swells to a bittersweet finale.” — New York Times

Two screenings:
Friday, January 28, 10:00 am and 2:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Tino Soriano
"La Zafra — The Sugar Cane Harvest "

Photojournalist Tino Soriano will show an additional 140 slides from his series “La Zafra” currently on exhibit at the Center for Latin American Studies. The series follows Haitian workers in the Dominican Republic as they harvest and process the sugar cane crop. Soriano will provide a technical analysis of selected photos and comment on the act of combining color and black and white photography to emphasize the most important aspects of an image.

Tino Soriano has won awards for his photography from UNESCO, World Press Photo Foundation and Fotopres and is a contributor to publications including National Geographic, El País Weekly and The Los Angeles Times. In 2001 he was contracted as a photographer for the National Geographic Society. Soriano also has an extensive background teaching photography and photojournalism

Friday, January 28, 1:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Alain de Janvry
“Can Mexico’s Social Programs Reduce Poverty?”

Mexico has been a pioneer in launching ambitious social programs to assist the poor, which are currently coordinated in the Contigo strategy. These programs have been quite effective in meeting basic needs, particularly among the poorest. However, they have been less successful in raising income through productive employment and micro-enterprises. Prof. de Janvry will discuss the reasons for these contradictory achievements and explore ways in which social and income-generating programs could be made complementary.

Alain de Janvry is an economist working on international economic development, with expertise principally in Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle-East and the Indian subcontinent. Fields of work include: poverty analysis, rural development, quantitative analysis of development policies, impact analysis of social programs, technological innovations in agriculture and the management of common property resources.

- Professor de Janvry's homepage
- Professor de Janvry's Powerpoint presentation from the event
- Paper on the effects of transfer payments on keeping children in school (.pdf file)

Monday, January 31, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event



Sabina Berman
“Theater Crossing Borders”

The work of playwright and director Sabina Berman examines contemporary issues from a feminist perspective. In her plays she has explored themes including sex and gender roles, Judaism and critiques of traditional patriarchal values in Mexican society. Among her successful works are El suplicio del placer (1976), Yankee (1979), Rompecabezas (1983), Herejía (1984), Muerte súbita (1988), Entre Villa y una mujer desnuda (1992), Molière (2000) and Feliz nuevo siglo, doktor Freud (2001). She is currently a Writer in Residence at UC Berkeley.

- Short description of some of Ms. Berman's work
- Article in Reforma about Ms. Berman's work and its influence in the U.S. (Spanish)

This talk will be held in Spanish.

Tuesday, February 1, 4:00 – 6:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Cine Contemporáneo

Mundo Grúa, by Pablo Trapero (1999)

Rulo is a 50-year-old ex-bass player from a famous 1970s rock group who now works as a crane operator. When a new laborer takes his job, Rulo leaves Buenos Aires as well as his new love, Adriana, and his son Claudio who hopes to follow in his father’s footsteps by forming a band of his own. 90 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, February 2, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Current Issues and New Perspectives
in Latin American Law

Joaquim Benedito Barbosa Gomes
“Recent Developments in Brazilian Public Law”

In 2003, Justice Barbosa became the first Afro-Brazilian member of the Supreme Court of Brazil. After graduating from law school, he worked for several years as a procurator in the Federal Public Ministry and subsequently obtained a master’s degree and a doctorate in public law at the University of Paris II (Panthéon-Assas). He has written extensively on affirmative action, race, equality and comparative constitutional law.

- Article from Sydney Morning Herald about Justice Barbosa's appointment to the Supreme Court

Co-sponsored with the Boalt Hall School of Law. A presentation of the Robbins Collection Lectures in Political Culture and Legal Tradition.

Tuesday, February 8, 4:00 pm
Goldberg Room, Boalt Hall

Analysis and photo of the event


Ramon Peñate Díaz and Miguel Pickard
“Chiapas Today”

Ramón Peña Diaz and Miguel Pickard will be speaking about the situation of the indigenous communities in Chiapas, the militarization of the state, paramilitary violence and, more broadly, the effects of NAFTA.

Ramon Peñate Díaz is a human rights defender from the Chol-speaking community of Emiliano Zapata in the municipality of Tila, the site of a Mexican Army base where human rights violations have taken place.

Miguel Pickard is an investigative researcher with the Centro de Investigaciones Económicas y Políticas de Acción Comunitaria (CIEPAC), a nonprofit organization which explores economic and political realities throughout Mexico, Central America and Latin America.

Cosponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Wednesday, February 9 from 3:00 – 4:45 pm
3335 Dwinelle Hall


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Gilberto Gil
"Contemporary Brazilian Culture"

Minister of Culture Gilberto Gil is one of the most important singers and composers in modern Brazilian pop music. In the 1960s he helped start the Tropicália movement that combined Brazil’s regional folk culture with international influences to create a new style of cinema, literature and music. He has served as Minister of Culture under President Luiz Inácio “Lula” da Silva since 2003.

- Minister Gil's website
- Feature from the Guardian about Minister Gil

This is a ticketed event. Tickets will be available at the Wheeler Auditorium box office beginning at 6:00 pm. Tickets are free of charge and will be given out on a first come, first served basis. One ticket per person.

Webcast of the event
Text of Minister Gil's speech (.pdf file)

Please note that cameras and camcorders are not permitted except for those carried by registered media representatives.

Thursday, February 17, 7:00 pm
Wheeler Auditorium, Wheeler Hall

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Nicholas Arons
"Something Funny Happened on the Way to the Drought
"

When droughts hit northeastern Brazil, thousands of rural workers are forced to abandon their homes and hundreds die of remediable disease. The double impact of drought and corruption — with politicians taking advantage of drought to buy votes and pilfer government accounts — contributes to an endless cycle of human suffering. Nicholas Arons utilizes traditional social science scholarship as well as literature, popular art and oral history to interpret the impact of drought and the phenomenon of drought politics.

Nicholas Arons graduated from NYU Law School. He is currently Legal Advisor to the Palau Mission to the UN and a Fellow in NYU Law School’s Institute for International Law and Justice.

- Mr. Arons' article on the drought in Brazil
- Article by Mr. Arons on the drinking culture in Brazil

Cosponsored with the Department of Anthropology and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Friday, February 18, 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

Photo of the event


Series:
Cine Contemporáneo

Cenizas del Paraíso, by Marcelo Piñeyro (1997)

Piñeyro tells a twisted story involving the suicide of a prominent judge and the violent murder of a young girl. Though the judge’s three sons confess to the girl’s murder, the truth behind these two events is far from clear. 130 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, February 23, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Current Issues and New Perspectives
in Latin American Law

José Ramón Cossío Díaz
“Constitutional Actions in Mexico”

Justice Cossío joined the Mexican Supreme Court in 2003. He is one of the top constitutional law scholars in Mexico and has published many works on constitutionalism, democracy and the rights of indigenous peoples. He has a master’s degree from the Spanish Center for Constitutional Studies and a doctorate from the Complutense University in Madrid.

- Paper by Justice Cossío Díaz, "Constitutional Order and Hierarchy in Mexico"
- Paper by Justice Cossío Díaz (in Spanish), "Jurisdiccion Constitucional y Reforma del Estado"

Co-sponsored with the Boalt Hall School of Law. A presentation of the Robbins Collection Lectures in Political Culture and Legal Tradition.

Friday, February 25, 4:00 pm
Venue Changed: Faculty Lounge, 336 Boalt Hall (North Addition)


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Walter Salles
“A Conversation with Walter Salles”

Brazilian filmmaker Walter Salles broke onto the international scene with the award-winning 1995 feature Foreign Land. Since then Salles has established himself as a force to be reckoned with, directing films such as Central Station and The Motorcycle Diaries, both nominated for Academy Awards. In addition to his work as a director and screenwriter, Salles has produced films by young Brazilian filmmakers including City of God and Madame Satã.

Mr. Salles will discuss his films and show clips from some of his recent works.

Friday, March 4, 7:00 pm
A
ndersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business (map)

Excerpts from Mr. Salles' remarks, and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Estelle Tarica
“Mestizo Nationalism”

In the mid-20th-century, a group of writers from Mexico, Bolivia and Peru attempted to describe what might be called the “inner life” of mestizo nationality. Prof. Tarica will examine particular instances of this mode of narrating the experience of modern nationality; discuss the important role played by indigenismo in making these attempts possible; and address them as forms of what Marisol de la Cadena terms “subordinate racism.”

Estelle Tarica is Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature and Culture at UC Berkeley. She received her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature from Cornell University and is currently finishing her first book, Intimate Indigenismo.

Monday, March 7, 12:00 - 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photo of the event


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Kevin Gallagher
“Guadalajara: The Silicon Valley of Mexico?”

Despite the fact that Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) has been the cornerstone of Mexico’s economic policy, it has not generally produced the “spillover” in technology and know-how that policy-makers hoped for. Is Guadalajara the exception to this lackluster record? To what extent has Guadalajara, known as “Mexico’s Silicon Valley,” managed to create domestic spillovers? Prof. Gallagher will discuss what has been done in Guadalajara and what lessons other Latin American countries might draw from that city’s experiences.

Kevin P. Gallagher is Assistant Professor in the Department of International Relations at Boston University and a Research Associate at the Global Development and Environment Institute (GDAE) at Tufts University. His most recent books are Putting Development First: The Importance of Policy Space in the WTO and IFIs (forthcoming, Zed Books, 2005), Free Trade and the Environment: Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond (Stanford, 2004) and International Trade and Sustainable Development (Earthscan, 2002).

-Professor Gallagher's Powerpoint presentation (warning: 3.8 MB file)
-Professor Gallagher's book page for Free Trade and the Environment

Tuesday, March 8, 12:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Current Issues and New Perspectives
in Latin American Law

Professor Carlos Rosenkrantz
“Problems in Argentine Commercial Law”

Note: Postponed until April 4
Goldberg Room, Boalt Hall


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Luiz Dulci
“Two Years of Lula's Government: Progress and Challenges”

As Chief Minister of the General Secretariat of the Presidency of the Republic of Brazil, Luiz Dulci is one of the closest advisors to Brazilian President Luiz Inácio “Lula” da Silva. Minister Dulci is also among the founders of the PT, the Brazilian Worker’s Party, and the CUT, Brazil’s leading national labor confederation. Since the foundation of the PT, he has held several important roles both within the party and for the party’s administrative governments, including work with Fundação Perseu Abramo, the PT’s political research foundation, and with the municipal government of Belo Horizonte.

Webcasts of the event in Portuguese and English.

-Article by Minister Dulci on social justice, from the PT website (in Portuguese)
-Interview with Minister Dulci (in Portuguese)

Monday, March 14, 4:00 pm
Morrison Room, Doe Library (map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Bridges Summer Field Research Symposium

This two-day symposium is a unique opportunity to learn about the current research done by UC Berkeley graduate students who spent last summer in Latin America. Field research grants were provided by CLAS with the generous support of Robert Bridges.

-Schedule of presentations

Tuesday, March 15, 2:00 – 3:45 pm and
Wednesday, March 16, 2:00 – 3:45 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas


Panel Discussion
“Crossing Borders: Trade Policy and Transnational Labor Education”

In 1998, the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers and the Center for Latin American Studies initiated a project which sought to inform union members about the realities of the global economy and the importance of the union’s role in trade policy. Between 1998 and 2002 nearly all the elected officials and appointed representatives of the Machinists union in the United States and Canada — about 600 people in all — journeyed to Tijuana in an effort at what might be called “transnational labor education.”

-Harley Shaiken, Professor of Education and Geography; Chair of the Center for Latin American Studies, UC Berkeley
-Owen Herrnstadt, Director of International Affairs, International Association of Machinists
-Catha Worthman, Strategic Campaigns Coordinator, Health Systems Division of the Service Employees International Union

Tuesday, March 15, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Cine Contemporáneo

25 Watts, by Pablo Rebella and Pablo Stoll (2001)

This simple, entertaining film tells the story of three young people who are bored with life in Montevideo. Lacking the drive to study, work or dedicate themselves to any particular cause, they find other ways to pass the time. 94 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, March 16, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

David Kyle
“The Transformation of Transnational Migration in Ecuador”

In a recent study of rural Ecuadorian communities with historically high levels of transnational migration, David Kyle and Brad Jokisch found that migration patterns have changed significantly. Migrants with legal status in the United States have decamped with their entire families. Those who did not get in before stiffer border controls were implemented must now pay smugglers up to $14,000 to get to the U.S. or try their luck in Spain. Prof. Kyle will discuss the causes and implications of these trends.

David Kyle is Associate Professor of Sociology at UC Davis. He is the author of Transnational Peasants: Migrations, Networks, and Ethnicity in Andean Ecuador (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000) and the co-editor of Global Human Smuggling: Comparative Perspectives (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2001). His current book project is Brokered Bodies: The Cross-Cultural Engineering of Contemporary Households.

Monday, March 28, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Cine Contemporáneo

El Leyton: Hasta que la muerte nos separe, by Gonzalo Justiniano (2002)

Long time friends Layton and Modesto are partners in a fishing business in a small Chilean fishing village. When Layton seduces Modesto’s wife, they find themselves entangled in a tragic story of love, lust, friendship and betrayal. 90 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, March 30, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Current Issues and New Perspectives
in Latin American Law

Denise Frossard
“Criminal Law and Corruption in Brazil”

In the early 1990s, Brazilian Congresswoman Denise Frossard was the trial judge who convicted several of the most prominent organized crime bosses in Rio de Janeiro. After the judgment, she spent a year in the United States, returning to head the Brazilian branches of Transparency International and the Women’s Bank. In 2002, she was elected Rio de Janeiro’s Representative to the Brazilian Congress in a landslide, garnering more votes in that election than any of her colleagues.

Co-sponsored with the Boalt Hall School of Law. A presentation of the Robbins Collection Lectures in Political Culture and Legal Tradition.

Postponed


IX ENCUENTRO LATINOAMERICANO EN BERKELEY
HOMENAJE A ANTONIO CORNEJO POLAR

Schedule of events

Saturday, April 2, 2005, 9:00 am - 6:30 pm
Morrison Room, Doe Library


Pensar México, April 4-8:
A Televised Collaboration of CLAS, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca

Pensar México
Identity

Join us for the live taping of Pensar México: Identity, the first in an innovative series of four television programs which will be aired nationally in the United States, Mexico and South America.

Participants include:
Amalia García Medina, Governor of the State of Zacatecas
Maria Echaveste,former White House Deputy Chief of Staff to President Clinton
Fernando Sariñana, Film Director
Jorge Cherbosque, Psychologist

Seating will be on a first come first serve basis, so please plan to arrive early.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca .

Monday, April 4, 12:00 noon
Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business
(map)

Analysis of the series


Series:
Current Issues and New Perspectives
in Latin American Law

Carlos Rosenkrantz
“Problems in Argentine Commercial Law”

Carlos Rosenkrantz is Professor of Law at the University of Buenos Aires and Palermo University. He has an LL.M. and J.S.D. from Yale Law School and teaches regularly at the Hauser Global Law School Program at New York University and the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona. He served as former President Raúl Alfonsín’s chief advisor at the 1994 Argentine Constitutional Convention.

- Paper by Professor Rosenkrantz, "In Defense of Equality"

Co-sponsored with the Boalt Hall School of Law. A presentation of the Robbins Collection Lectures in Political Culture and Legal Tradition.

Monday, April 4, 4:00 pm
Goldberg Room, Boalt Hall
(map)


Series:
The U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum
Event Series

Amalia García Medina
"The U.S. and Mexico: A View from Zacatecas"

Amalia García Medina is the governor of the state of Zacatecas, Mexico. Previously she served two terms as a Federal Deputy and was the vice-president of the Executive Committee of the Chamber of Deputies. Governor García Medina was also a senator and a legislator in the Legislative Assembly of Mexico City. She is dedicated to a number of causes, including equal rights for women, human rights and the fight against corruption. Her tireless work promoting citizens' initiatives has led to substantial changes in the political system.

Monday, April 4, 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Fim Screening: Romero
Directed by John Duigan (1989)

Romero is the true story of Oscar Romero, the Catholic Archbishop of San Salvador from 1977–80. His principled and public stand against the human rights abuses committed by the U.S.-backed El Salvadoran government led to death threats and assassination attempts. In spite of this, Romero continued to speak out until his untimely death.

Following the video Michael Rhodes, the supervising producer of Romero, will discuss the production of the film and answer questions.

Co-sponsored with the Graduate Theological Union.

Tuesday, April 5, 6:45 pm
Bade Museum, Pacific School of Religion, 1798 Scenic Ave.


Film Screening: Amar Te Duele / Love Hurts
Directed by Fernando Sariñana (2002)

This Romeo and Juliet story set in Mexico City explores class discrimination through the characters of Ulises, a sales clerk from a poor neighborhood, and Renata, the daughter of a wealthy family. The two meet at a shopping mall and fall in love but must overcome the obstacles set by the attitudes of their families and friends. 104 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles

Tuesday, April 5, 7:30 pm
155 Kroeber Hall


Javier Auyero
"Dissecting the 2001 Lootings"

Javier Auyero received his Ph.D. from the New School for Social Research in 1997 and is currently Associate Professor of Sociology at SUNY-Stony Brook. Auyero's first book, Poor People's Politics (Duke University Press, 2001), won the New England Council for Latin American Studies Best Book Prize and was a C. Wright Mills Award finalist. In 2003, Auyero published Contentious Lives: Two Argentine Women, Two Protests, and the Quest for Recognition (Duke University Press).

Part of "on Argentina," an interdisciplinary lecture series. For more information visit:
http://spanish-portuguese.berkeley.edu/events/argentina.html

Wednesday, April 6, 12:00 pm
Room 5125, Dwinelle Hall


Pensar México, April 4-8:
A Televised Collaboration of CLAS, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca

Pensar México
Security

Join us for the live taping of Pensar México: Security, the second in an innovative series of four television programs which will be aired nationally in the United States, Mexico and South America.

Participants include:
Adolfo Aguilar Zínser, former Mexican Ambassador to the United Nations
Mark Danner, Professor of Journalism, UC Berkeley
Antonio Navalón, Director of Alfaguara Editors
José Alberto Aguilar (PRI), Undersecretary for International Affairs, PRI Executive Committee
Mario Di Costanzo (PRD), economic advisor to Mayor López Obrador

Seating will be on a first come first serve basis, so please plan to arrive early.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca .

Wednesday, April 6, 4:00 pm
Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business
(map)

Analysis of the series


Film Screening
Preguntas sin respuesta. Los asesinatos y desapariciones de mujeres en Ciudad Juárez y Chihuahua
Directed by Rafael Montero (2004)

This journalistic documentary tells the story of the hundreds of women who have been murdered or disappeared in Ciudad Juárez. Through interviews with victims’ family members, who describe their struggles to seek justice, as well as with government officials and human rights organizations, director Rafael Montero gives a sense of immediacy to the tragedy that has continued unabated for more than a decade. 120 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Rafael Montero will be available to answer questions after the film.

Wednesday, April 6, 7:00 pm
160 Kroeber Hall
(map)


Series:
The U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum
Event Series

Juan Ramón de la Fuente
"Education, Competitiveness and Reforms in Mexico"

Dr. de la Fuente is the rector of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) where he is responsible for a community of more than 250,000 students and 30,000 faculty and administrative workers. Previously, he has been appointed to key international positions: Vice President of the World Health Assembly, President of the Board of the United Nations Program on AIDS, and President of the Net of Macro-Universities of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Thursday, April 7, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


 Film Screening: Todo el Poder / All the Power
Directed by Fernando Sariñana (1999)

This black comedy centers on the politics and corruption that shroud the Mexican police system. Featuring Demián Bichir as Gabriel, a filmmaker whose career has left him assaulted and robbed in broad daylight more times than he cares to remember, the film itself was inspired by Sariñana’s personal experience with urban crime oftentimes perpetrated by the police themselves. 102 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

NOTE: DAY AND LOCATION CHANGED TO
Thursday, April 7, 7:30 pm
155 Kroeber Hall


Pensar México, April 4-8:
A Televised Collaboration of CLAS, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca

Pensar México
Power

Join us for the live taping of Pensar México: Power, the third in an innovative series of four television programs which will be aired nationally in the United States, Mexico and South America.

Participants include:
Juan Ramón de la Fuente, Rector of the National Autonomous University of Mexico
Porfirio Muñoz Ledo, co-founder of the PRD, former ambassador to the European Union
Laura Nader, Professor of Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Jorge Matte, founder and president of Estudios Psico-Industriales, S.A.
Enrique Cabrero Mendoza,
Professor of Public Administration, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económicas A.C.

Seating will be on a first come first serve basis, so please plan to arrive early.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca .

Friday, April 8, 10:00 am
Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business
(map)

Analysis of the series


Pensar México, April 4-8:
A Televised Collaboration of CLAS, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca

Pensar México
Future

Join us for the live taping of Pensar México: Future, the fourth in an innovative series of four television programs which will be aired nationally in the United States, Mexico and South America.

Participants include:
Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas (PRD)
Felipe Calderón (PAN)
Enrique Norten, Architect
Luis Enrique Mercado, General Manager of El Economista

Seating will be on a first come first serve basis, so please plan to arrive early.

Co-sponsored by the Center for Latin American Studies, Boalt Hall School of Law, and Fundación Azteca.

Friday, April 8, 1:00 pm
Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business
(map)

Analysis of the series


Series:
Bay Area Latin American Forum

Beatriz Magaloni
“Neoliberal Economic Policies and Partisan Cleavages in Latin America”
 

Latin America has experienced a profound economic transformation during the past three decades, with most countries in the region abandoning Import Substitution Industrialization in favor of “neoliberal” economic policies. Although the results of these policies vary considerably across the region, economic growth remains elusive. Prof. Magaloni will discuss the extent of support for neoliberal policies in Latin America using macroeconomic data and a region-wide survey on economic attitudes conducted in 1998.

Beatriz Magaloni is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Stanford University. She recently finished a manuscript entitled Voting for Autocracy: The Politics of Hegemonic Party Survival and Demise soon to be released by Cambridge University Press. She has written numerous articles on the Mexican democratization, including many on voting behavior, political parties and the rule of law.

Monday, April 11, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Gabriel Giorgi
"The Biopolitical Imagination: Literature and Eugenics"

Gabriel Giorgi studied literature and semiotics at the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, where he went on to work as professor and researcher. He then received his Ph.D. in Latin American Literature from NYU. Giorgi is currently Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Spanish & Portuguese at USC. In 2004 Giorgi published Sueños de Exterminio: Homosexualidad y representación en la literatura argentina contemporánea.

Part of "on Argentina," an interdisciplinary lecture series. For more information visit:
http://spanish-portuguese.berkeley.edu/events/argentina.html

Monday, April 11, 5:00 pm
Room 5125, Dwinelle Hall


Film Screening
Peões
, by Eduardo Coutinho (2004)

In this documentary about the 1979 and 1980 Metallurgist’s Trade Union strikes in Brazil, the people who participated in the events tell their stories. They speak of the origins of the movement, the involvement of current Brazilian president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva and the paths their lives have taken. 85 minutes. Portuguese with English subtitles.

Coming of Age on the Streets of Rio, by Udi Mandel Butler (2002)

This documentary explores the lives of street children as they come of age in Rio de Janeiro. Their life trajectories are explored in terms of their own perceptions and representations. Key themes include: the family, the process of going to the street, day-to-day survival, the children’s perceptions of the positive and negative aspects of street life and their hopes for the future. 55 minutes, Portuguese with English subtitles.

Both movies are presented as part of the Violence and the Americas conference.

Thursday, April 14, 6:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


 

Series:
Cine Contemporáneo

La Ciénaga, by Lucrecia Martel (2001)

In this film set in the high plains of northwestern Argentina during the dog days of summer, director Lucrecia Martel paints a somber portrait of a middle-class family trying to preserve a semblance of European class and traditions. 102 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Please note, this event has been replaced by the following:

Lucrecia Martel
"La Ciénaga: A Screening of the Film and Discussion with the Filmmaker"

Lucrecia Martel is one of Argentina's leading and most singular new filmmakers. She has written and directed two award-winning feature films, La Ciénaga / The Swamp (2001) and La Niña Santa / The Holy Girl (2004), as well as a number of shorts and documentaries. She lives and works in Buenos Aires.

Part of "on Argentina," an interdisciplinary lecture series. For more information visit:
http://spanish-portuguese.berkeley.edu/events/argentina.html

Friday, April 15, 2:00 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall


Conference:
Violence and the Americas

Conference:
“Violence and the Americas”

In Latin America, the relationships between the state, violence and the forces of globalization are continuously shifting. The conference “Violence and the Americas” will examine the connections between state legacies of abuse, criminal practices and new social movements, with a focus on Brazil, Colombia and Mexico. Topics to be explored include: the legitimacy of state violence; criminal violence as masked resistance; hybrid social identities that transcend the limits of class, ethnicity and religious affiliation; and the role of the state in a global context.

Co-sponsored with the Townsend Center for the Humanities and the Colombian Working Group with funds from the UC Berkeley Graduate Assembly.

- Conference Schedule

Friday, April 15 and Saturday April 16
Geballe Room, Stephens Hall
(map)

Analysis of the Plenary session
Analysis of the First Panel
Analysis of the Second Panel


Carlos Forment
"Democracy in Latin America: Civic Selfhood and Public Life in Peru and Mexico"

Carlos Forment will discuss his recent two-volume book, Democracy in Latin America, 1760-1900: Civic Selfhood and Public Life (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press), a highly ambitious work that seeks to create the book Tocqueville would have written had he traveled to Latin America instead of the United States. Forment studied countless newspapers, partisan pamphlets, tabloids, journals, private letters and travelogues in order to illustrate how citizens of Latin America established strong democratic traditions in their countries through the practice of democracy in their everyday lives.

Carlos A. Forment is the director of the Centro de Investigación y Documentación de la Vida Pública in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Previously, he was a member of the School for Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study. Dr. Forment is now studying the emergence of democratic practices in contemporary Argentina.

Monday, April 18, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Lucrecia Martel, B. Ruby Rich, Natalia Brizuela
"On Storytelling"

Lucrecia Martel is one of Argentina's leading and most singular new filmmakers. She has written and directed two award-winning feature films, La Ciénaga / The Swamp (2001) and La Niña Santa / The Holy Girl (2004), as well as a number of shorts and documentaries. She lives and works in Buenos Aires.

B. Ruby Rich is a film critic and cultural theorist who contributes regularly to the Village Voice and the San Francisco Bay Guardian. She also teaches documentary film and queer studies at UC Berkeley.

Natalia Brizuela is Assistant Professor of Latin American Literature and Culture in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at UC Berkeley.

Part of "on Argentina," an interdisciplinary lecture series. For more information visit:
http://spanish-portuguese.berkeley.edu/events/argentina.html

Wednesday, April 20, 5:00 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall


Series
Rio Branco Forum on Brazil

Luiz Fernando Furlan
"Ethanol and Renewable Fuels: The Brazilian Experience"

Luiz Fernando Furlan was appointed Minister of Development, Industry and Foreign
Trade by Brazilian President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva in 2002. Prior to becoming minister, he was President of the Administration Council of Sadia S.A., one of Brazil’s largest food processing companies. Minister Furlan has held several executive positions including Second Vice-President and Director of Foreign Trade at FIESP/CIESP (Federation of Industries of the State of São Paulo), Vice-President of the Brazilian Foreign Trade Association and President, from 2000 to 2002, of the Entrepreneurial Leaders Forum. He has also served as a member of the Global Corporate Governance Forum and the Private Sector Advisory Group of the World Bank.

Wednesday, April 20, 6:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

Juan Guzmán
“Creating Justice: The Pursuit of Human Rights Crimes in Chile”

Justice for human rights cases in Chile has been a long time coming. Judge Juan Guzmán will discuss the progress of justice from the time of the 1973 coup that overthrew President Salvador Allende to the present. He divides the process into four stages: 1) the period of “absolute concealment” from 1973–78 when only 10 out of 10,000 habeus corpuses filed were accepted; 2) the period of “total impunity” from 1978–90 when a general amnesty law protected those who had committed human rights abuses; 3) the “as much justice as possible” period from 1991–98 when the first rulings on human rights crimes took place; 4) the period from 1998–present when the institutions of justice began to perform the full scope of their duties.

A judge since 1972, Juan Guzmán has spent the last seven years overseeing the Chilean case against former dictator Augusto Pinochet. He is Professor of Procedural and Penal Law at the Universidad Católica, SEK Internacional, Universidad de las Américas and Universidad de la República in Chile and teaches at the Chilean Police Academy.

-Judge Guzman's notes from the talk

Monday, April 25, 7:00 pm
Morrison Room, Doe Library

Analysis and photos of the event


Hernán Diaz
"Figures of Confinement"

Hernán Diaz studied Literature at the University of Buenos Aires, where he went on to teach literary theory. He is an active member of an ongoing University of Buenos Aires research group Concepciones y operaciones de la crítica. He received an MA in Latin American Literature from King's College, London and is currently a doctoral candidate in Spanish and Portuguese at NYU, completing a dissertation titled Figures of Containment: Literature and Claustrophobia.

Part of "on Argentina," an interdisciplinary lecture series. For more information visit:
http://spanish-portuguese.berkeley.edu/events/argentina.html

Wednesday, April 27, 6:00 pm
Room 5125, Dwinelle Hall


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Alvaro Ramazzini
“Perspectives on CAFTA and Immigration”

Bishop Alvaro Ramazzini, an internationally recognized human rights activist, is the
bishop of the Dioceses of San Marcos, Guatemala and president of the Episcopal Secretariat of Central America (SEDAC). In his work with campesinos, immigrants and the landless, Bishop Ramazzini has consistently promoted rural development. Along with other bishops, he also played a pivotal role in the 1996 Peace Accords and is active in the promotion of the Recovery of Historical Memory Project (REMHI) in San Marcos. The REMHI report found state agents responsible for nearly 90 percent of human rights abuses during Guatemala’s 36 year armed conflict.

In Spanish, with English translation.

-Transcript of Bishop Ramazzini's testimony on CAFTA

Monday, May 2, 4:00 pm
Howard Room, Men’s Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis of Ramazzini and Stein events, and photos of this event


Mark Healey and Jeffrey Hadler
“After the Catastrophe: Historical Perspectives from Argentina and Indonesia”

“The Ruins of the New Argentina: Remaking San Juan After the 1944 Earthquake”

The worst natural disaster in Argentina’s history, the 1944 San Juan earthquake served as an indictment of a corrupt political order and an invitation for transformation. This talk will address the place of disaster in political transformation and the limits and contours of that eventual transformation.

Mark Healey is Assistant Professor of History at UC Berkeley.

“Indeterminate Frames: Earthquakes and Uprisings in Sumatran History”

In Minangkabau, Indonesia, the failed Padri War that ended in 1833 and a failed Islamic-Communist uprising in 1926 were both marked by destructive earthquakes. This talk explores the connections between the earthquakes, the coincidence of political change and whether the disasters were historically decisive events.

Jeffrey Hadler is Assistant Professor of South & Southeast Asian Studies at UC Berkeley.

Moderated by Prof. Peter Zinoman, History & Southeast Asian Studies

Co-sponsored with the Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Wednesday, May 4, 12:15 – 2:00 pm
Room 3335, Dwinelle Hall

Photos of the event


Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Series
Development, Labor Standards, and Economic Integration in the Americas

Eduardo Stein
“The Impact of the Central American Free Trade Agreement”

Eduardo Stein is the Vice President of the Republic of Guatemala. Previously, he was a consultant for the International Organization for Migration, focusing on strategies and development projects related to issues of migration to the U.S. Dr. Stein also served as Guatemala’s Foreign Minister from 1996–2000. In that capacity he was an active participant in the country’s peace process during the final negotiating phases (1996) and in the promotion of international support for the implementation phases (1997-99). He helped revamp Guatemala’s foreign relations agenda in several fields including human rights, indigenous peoples’ rights, foreign aid, regional development, environmental issues, trade and tourism.

- Interview with Dr. Stein by the Fund for Peace (2002)

Wednesday, May 4, 4:00 pm
Howard Room, Faculty Club
(map)

Analysis of this and the Ramazzini event, and photos of this event


Series:
The U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum
Event Series

José Natividad González Parás
Title to be announced

José Natividad González Parás is the Governor of Nuevo León, Mexico.

Postponed

CLAS Events
by semester

 
© 2012, The Regents of the University of California, Last Updated - February 6, 2006