SPRING 2006 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Kirsten Sehnbruch
“Michelle Bachelet: Chile’s First Female President”

Michelle Bachelet,
President-elect of Chile.

President-elect Michelle Bachelet will be the first female president in the history of Chile and the first female president elected purely on her own name and merits in South America. This means that the Concertación — the coalition of center-left parties that has governed since Chile’s return to democracy in 1990 — will be in power for four more years. And again, the right-wing opposition, after an initially strong performance, has fallen apart in the course of the election campaign. Who is Michelle Bachelet? What can we expect from her new government? Will the fact that she is a woman make a difference? What future is there for the opposition in Chile ? And what were the main themes and developments in the election campaign that led to Bachelet’s victory? This talk will provide some answers to these questions.

- BBC reporting on Bachelet's victory

Kirsten Sehnbruch is a visiting scholar at the Center for Latin American Studies. Her research focuses on Latin American labor markets and related concerns of social security, poverty and income inequality. Her book The Chilean Labor Market will be published by Palgrave Macmillan early in 2006.

- Dr. Sehnbruch's Web site
- Dr. Sehnbruch's book, The Chilean Labor Market

Monday, January 23, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Series:
Cine Documental

Al Otro Lado (To the Other Side), by Natalia Almada (2005)

An aspiring corrido composer from the drug capital of Mexico faces two choices to better his life: to traffic drugs or to cross the border illegally into the United States. From Sinaloa, Mexico, to the streets of East L.A., “Al Otro Lado” explores the world of drug smuggling, illegal immigration and the corrido music that chronicles it all. 70 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, January 25, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Kent Eaton
“Bolivian Regional Autonomy: A Reaction Against Indigenous Mobilization”

Increasingly, scholars, policymakers and observers of Bolivian politics have focused their attention on new forms of political mobilization by the country’s indigenous majority. This mobilization has produced some of the most sensational news of recent years including the 2000 Water War against the Bechtel Corporation, the 2003 Gas War against the Sánchez de Losada administration and the 2005 election of Evo Morales as president. Less sensationally, the emergence of indigenous Bolivians as powerful political actors has begun to generate a backlash in the form of escalating demands for regional autonomy in Santa Cruz, Bolivia’s most economically developed and politically conservative department.

Kent Eaton is Associate Professor of Political Science at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and Visiting Professor in the Department of Political Science at UC Berkeley. He is the author of Politicians and Economic Reform in New Democracies: Argentina and the Philippines in the 1990s and Politics beyond the Capital: The Design of Subnational Institutions in South America.

Monday, January 30, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall
(map)

Article about and photos of the event


Chesa Boudin
“Venezuela ’s ‘Bolivarian’ Revolution”

Hugo Chávez, Venezuela’s controversial president, has survived several ouster attempts, including a short-lived coup. While his populist speeches cause jitters in Washington, Chávez himself claims to be creating an alternative 21st century socialism that courts international capital.

Currently a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, Chesa Boudin recently spent a year in Venezuela working as a writer and a political analyst in President Hugo Chávez’s International Relations office. He is a co-author of The Venezuelan Revolution: 100 Questions—100 Answers and the translator of Understanding the Venezuelan Revolution: Hugo Chávez talks to Marta Harnecker.

Co-sponsored by the Venezuela Working Group.

Tuesday, February 7, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
3335 Dwinelle Hall

Photos of the event


Series:
U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum

David Shields
“The Mexican Oil Industry: Problems and Policy Options”

Mexico — the sixth biggest oil producing nation in the world and one of the three main oil exporters to the United States — appears to have reached a peak oil scenario in which oil output levels are likely to decline sharply in the near term. Meanwhile, the company, which enjoys monopoly status in the Mexican market, is reaching a crisis point on many fronts, ranging from major indebtedness to corporate governance to aging infrastructure. A number of reform options are available to the next Mexican president, but none of them are easy fixes and all could be thwarted by a divided Congress.

David Shields is a journalist and private consultant on energy matters in Mexico. He is the editor of Energía a Debate (www.energiaadebate.com.mx) and the author of PEMEX, Un Futuro Incierto (Pemex: An Uncertain Future).

Thursday, February 9, 4:00 pm
Institute of International Studies Conference Room, 223 Moses Hall
(map)

Photos of the event


Tinker Summer Field Research Symposium

This two-day symposium is a unique opportunity to learn about the current research done by UC Berkeley graduate students who spent last summer in Latin America. Field research grants were provided by CLAS with the generous support of the Tinker Foundation.

Schedule of presentations

Tuesday, February 14, 2:00 – 4:00 pm and
Wednesday, February 15, 2:00 – 4:30 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the symposium


Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

Fredy Peccerelli
“The Search for the Disappeared and the Guatemalan Forensic Anthropology Foundation”

Fredy Peccerelli is the founder and director of the Guatemalan Forensic Anthropology Foundation (FAFG) which was established in 1992 to bring forensic science to the task of identifying the remains of the thousands of people who disappeared during the counterinsurgency campaigns of the 1980s. As of 2005, FAFG has conducted 500 investigations and recovered the remains of 3,390 persons located in clandestine graves. Many have been identified and returned to their families.

Co-sponsored by the Human Rights Center.

Wednesday, February 15, 5:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Series:
Cine Documental

Peões (Metalworkers), by Eduardo Coutinho (2004)

Through interviews with workers who participated in the 1979-80 metalworkers strikes led by Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva — the man who would become president in 2002 — this film offers a fascinating look at the movement, its leaders and the origins of political commitment. 85 minutes. Portuguese with English subtitles.

Wednesday, February 15, 7:00 pm
2060 Valley Life Sciences Building
(map)

 

Series:
U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum

Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas
"The Future of U.S.–Mexico Relations"

What lies ahead for the United States and Mexico? Cuauhtémoc Cardenas will discuss the challenges and opportunities the two countries face as they become ever more interdependent.

Cuauhtémoc Cárdenas, one of the founders of the Partido de la Revolución Democrática (PRD), was the mayor of Mexico City from 1997–99 and a three-time presidential candidate.

A webcast of this event is now available here. (RealPlayer file)

To receive notice of future CLAS events, please click here.

Thursday, March 2, 7:00 pm
Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business
(map) · (parking information)

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Elizabeth Farnsworth
“Bringing Pinochet to Justice”

Augusto Pinochet, Chile’s military dictator from 1973 until 1990, is under indictment in Santiago for kidnapping and murder, among other charges. He is currently free on bail and may face trial soon. Elizabeth Farnsworth will screen portions of her forthcoming documentary “The Pursuers” which follows the investigative work of Judge Juan Guzmán and others pursuing justice in Chile. The documentary takes viewers inside some of the most important investigations and cases and places them in context, showing how international human rights law has been fortified by Chileans’ efforts to hold Pinochet accountable for atrocities committed during his dictatorship.

Elizabeth Farnsworth is a special correspondent on the NewsHour with Jim Lehrer. Her writings have appeared in Foreign Policy, World Policy Journal, The San Francisco Chronicle and The Nation, among other publications. She also has produced and directed several hour-long documentaries for PBS.

Monday, March 6, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Cine Documental

La Sierra, by Scott Dalton and Margarita Martinez (2005)

Set in the Medellín barrio of La Sierra, this documentary is an intimate, unflinching portrait of three lives defined by violence and a community wracked by conflict. With no narration, the story is told by the film’s subjects in a series of revealing interviews. 84 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, March 8, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Ambassador Roberto Abdenur

Roberto Abdenur
"Brazil: The Economy, Trade and U.S. Relations"

Ambassador Roberto Abdenur will discuss the current state of the Brazilian economy as well as its political and trade relationship with the United States.

Roberto Abdenur is the Brazilian Ambassador to the United States. A career diplomat, he was Secretary-General of External Relations from 1993 to 1995 and has served as Ambassador to Austria, Germany, China and Ecuador. He is an experienced negotiator in economic and political forums and has a unique knowledge of Brazil’s complexity and the challenges it faces.

Thursday, March 9, 5:00 pm
Lounge, Women’s Faculty Club

Analysis and photos of the event


Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

Film Screening: "Machuca"
Directed by Andrés Wood (2004)

Set in Santiago, Chile during the last days of Salvador Allende’s presidency, “Machuca” explores the friendship that grows between shy, middle-class Gonzalo and streetwise Machuca when a private Catholic boy’s school opens its doors to a handful of children from the nearby shantytown. The boys are fascinated by each other’s respective worlds, and through their eyes we see the deep divisions that split their society. 121 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

The director will introduce the film and answer questions after the screening.

Monday, March 13, 7:00 pm
Pacific Film Archive, 2575 Bancroft Way
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


 
Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

Andrés Wood
"Making Movies in Latin America"

One of Chile’s most successful young filmmakers, Andrés Wood received a degree in economics from the Universidad Católica de Chile and then changed directions, attending film school at New York University . His films include “Loco Fever,” “Football Stories” and “Machuca,” which was chosen as Chile ’s entry for best foreign language film at the 2005 Oscars.

Tuesday, March 14, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Analysis and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Laura Nader
“Imperial Uses of the Rule of Law”

Laura Nader is Professor of Anthropology at UC Berkeley. Her current work focuses on how central dogmas are made and how they work in law, energy science and anthropology. She is the author of several books including The Life of the Law: Anthropological Projects (2002) and received the 1995 Kalven Prize for distinguished research on law and society.

Monday, March 20, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Luis Primo
“Workers’ Control and Labor Unions in Venezuela”

Luis Primo will discuss the current situation of labor unions and worker-managed factories in Venezuela.

Luis Primo is Regional Coordinator for the Venezuelan National Union of Workers (UNT) in the Caracas–Miranda area. He is also responsible for the union’s political education program at the national level and works with the Ministry of Labor to promote workers’ control in recovered idle factories.

Co-sponsored by the Venezuela Working Group.

Wednesday, March 22,  1:00 – 3:00 pm
3335 Dwinelle Hall, Office Wing, Level C

Photos of the event


Series
Conflict, Memory and Transitions

Pinochet’s Children
Directed by Paula Rodriguez (2002)

This film documents the experiences of three Chileans who grew up under Pinochet and whose lives are marked by the phases of the dictatorship. In the early years, they experience exile and the murder of their parents. In the 1980s, they rebel against the administration and become student leaders. As they mature, the compromises of the transition to democracy bring disillusionment and disengagement from political life. Finally, the arrest of Pinochet serves as turning point, causing the three protagonists to re-evaluate their positions. 82 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

The director will introduce the film and answer questions after the screening.

Thursday, March 23, 7:00 – 9:00 pm
Room 160, Kroeber Hall
(map)

Photos of the event


Series:
Cine Documental

The Spectre of Hope, by Paul Carlin (2001)

Photojournalist Sebastião Salgado joins art critic John Berger in an intimate conversation about photography, economics and globalization as they pore over photos from his collection “Migrations.” Six years and 43 countries in the making, “Migrations” contains photographs of people pushed from their homes and traditions to cities and their margins. 52 minutes. English.

Looking Back at You, by Andrew Snell (1995)

This documentary focuses on Sebastião Salgado’s photo essay “Workers” which records the displacement of manual labor by technological advances in countries ranging from Cuba to Italy to Bangladesh. The film also includes archival footage of Salgado’s life and commentary by artists, photographers, critics and writers such as Jorge Armado, Robert Delpire, Jimmy Fox and Arthur Miller. 59 minutes. English.

Wednesday, April 5, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Salomón Kalmanovitz
“The Political Economy of the U.S.–Colombia Free Trade Agreement”

Salomón Kalmanovitz will discuss the economic and institutional implications of the recently signed U.S.–Colombia free trade agreement.

Salomón Kalmanovitz is Professor Emeritus of Economics at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia. He served on the Board of Directors of Colombia’s Central Bank, the Banco de la República, from 1993 to 2005 and ran for the senate in 2006 as a representative of the Visionarios con Antanas Mockus party.

Co-sponsored by the Colombia Working Group, the Violence in the Americas Working Group, ASUC and the ASUC Academic affairs Office.

Thursday, April 6, 4:00 – 6:00 pm
O’Neil Room, The Faculty Club


Raúl A. Fernández
“Cuban Music and Latin Jazz”

Cuban dance music is connected, both musically and historically, to other Caribbean music, to salsa and to Latin Jazz. Prof. Fernández, who spent nine years conducting interviews with musicians, will explore the substantial contributions made by Afro-Cuban performers to the development of Latin Jazz.

Raúl A. Fernández is Professor of Social Sciences at UC Irvine. His research focuses on the economic and cultural transactions between the U.S. and Latin America. His most recent book is From Afro-Cuban Rhythms to Latin Jazz (2006).  

Co-sponsored by the Cuba Working Group.  

Friday, April 7, 12:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Film Screening: Latino Stories of World War II
Directed by Mario Barrera (2006)

Although an estimated 250,000 to 500,000 American Latinos fought in World War II, their contribution is virtually unknown to the American public. This documentary is the first to tell their stories, which have been “missing in action” for far too long. Four surviving veterans describe their experiences in their own words. These veterans served in the Air Force, the Army and the Marines and fought in three different theaters of World War II: Europe, the Pacific and India-China-Burma. 60 minutes. English.

Thursday, April 13, 7:00 pm
160 Kroeber Hall


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Lowell Bergman
“The Way Things Work: Multinational Corporations in Latin America”

Lowell Bergman was one of the founding members of the Center for Investigative Reporting and spent 16 years as a producer with CBS’s “60 Minutes.” More recently he has been a frequent contributor to the New York Times and served as both producer and correspondent for numerous PBS Frontline documentaries. He received the Pulitzer Prize in 2004 for his New York Times series on workplace safety. He is currently an Adjunct Professor of Journalism at UC Berkeley.

Monday, April 17, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall

Analysis and photos of the event


João Camillo Penna
“Including Violence: Mediations on War in Brazil”

“Cidade de Deus” and “Falcão — Meninos do tráfico” are case studies in the equivocal role media images play in the representation of narcotrafficking in Brazil and the kids who act as “soldiers” in the drug distribution structure. These films — which portray the “kids’ point of view” — provide a counterpoint to the flattened image of the favelas held by the Brazilian upper classes. The result, as witnessed by the polemics which surrounded the two films, remains ambiguous: they reproduce a stereotype (all favela kids are dealers), while at the same time providing provide inclusion to some individuals who would otherwise have remained excluded and invisible or who would have been seen as enemies of society.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

João Camillo Penna teaches in the Department of Literature at the Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ). He has published many articles on the subject of violence, testimony and music.

Thursday, April 20, 5:00 pm
NEW LOCATION: Spanish Department Library, 5125 Dwinelle Hall
(map)

Photos of the event


Solain Pierre and Roxanna Altholz
Identidades Negadas: Haitians in the Dominican Republic

Solain Pierre is the founder and director of El Movimiento de Mujeres Dominico-Haitiana (MUDHA) and a leader in the national political movement working for the rights of Dominico-Haitians. In 2003, Solain received the Amnesty International Ginetta Sagan Award for her work.

Roxanna Altholz is Lecturer in Residence in the International Human Rights Law Clinic at the Boalt Hall School of Law. She served as co-counsel with the clinic representing two girls of Haitian descent in a suit against the Dominican Republic for discriminatory denial of their rights to nationality and education.

Co-sponsored by Cross Cultural Student Development, the International Human Rights Law Clinic at Boalt Law School, the ASUC Art Studio and the UC Berkeley African American Studies Department.

Friday, April 21, 2:30 pm
Multicultural Center, Martin Luther King Building, First Floor
(map)

PRESENTED IN CONJUNCTION WITH

Daniel Yaffe
Identidades Negadas : Haitians in the Dominican Republic

This photoresearch project visually explores the conditions endured by people of Haitian descent in the Dominican Republic. Denied basic human rights by a government that systematically refuses to grant them citizenship, they continue to live in extreme poverty.

Daniel Yaffe is an award-winning photojournalist and a Development Studies major at UC Berkeley.

Co-sponsored by Cross Cultural Student Development, the International Human Rights Law Clinic at Boalt Law School, the ASUC Art Studio and the UC Berkeley African American Studies Department.

Photos on Display
Monday, April 10 – Friday, May 5
Multicultural Center, Martin Luther King Building, First Floor
(map)
Open to the public 9:00 am – 5:00 pm weekdays


Conference:
Mayab Bejlae/Yucatan Today: Language, Education, Health, Migration and Indigeneity
April 21–23, 2006

Over 900,000 Yucatec Maya speakers live in Yucatan, Mexico and abroad. More than 20,000 Yucatecos live in the San Francisco Bay Area alone. Migration between California and Mexico has formed new relationships to the Maya language, educational institutions and political processes. This conference will address issues such as: the Maya language as a political artefact; the education system and policies in rural Yucatan; socioeconomic development in relation to sexual health; transnational Yucatec workers in the globalized service sector in urban California; and the construction and politics of “Maya” indigeneity.

Co-sponsored with the Townsend Center for the Humanities, Asociación Mayab, the Kroeber Anthropological Society Papers, the Department of Anthropology, the Native American Cultural Center, the Mission Presbyterian Church, and the Graduate Assembly.

For more information, or if you are interested in becoming involved, please contact:

Beatriz Reyes-Cortes mireya18@berkeley.edu
Timoteo Rodriguez iknal@berkeley.edu

Conference Schedule
Speakers

Friday, April 21, 10:00 am – 8:00 pm and
Saturday, April 22, 10:00 am – 6:30 pm
Gifford Room, 221 Kroeber Hall

Sunday, April 23, 1:00 – 10:00 pm
Mission Presbyterian Church, San Francisco


Cristina Patriota de Moura
“Suburbia in the U.S. and Gated Communities in Brazil: A Comparative Perspective”

The past decades have seen the rapid spread of large, master-planned enclosed neighborhoods for the upper and middle-classes in many metropolitan areas of Brazil. These communities — which can also be seen in other parts of Latin America and across the globe — bear great similarities to suburban spatial arrangements in the U.S. Professor Patriota de Moura will explore the combinations of local and global processes which influence suburban lifestyles and imaginaries.

Cristina Patriota de Moura is Professor of Anthropology at the State University of Goias. Her current research deals with the global spread of gated communities, with specific emphasis on a comparative study of U.S. suburban lifestyles and horizontal condominiums in Brazil.

Tuesday, April 25, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Series:
Cine Documental

Siete días en el Once (Seven Days in Once), by Daniel Burman (2001)

Rich in local flavors, this documentary portrays the daily life in the Once neighborhood of Buenos Aires where Jews have settled since the early 20 th century. Through casual conversation Burman provides a folk history of the neighborhood, its residents, its institutions and the effects of the 1994 terrorist attack on the Jewish Community Center at its heart. 42 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Japón a través de los mares (Japan Across the Seas),
by Mabel Maio (1998)

This documentary describes the ways in which the culture and people of Japan came to Argentina. In this mosaic of traditions we see the many fusions produced through cross-cultural contact. The life histories of many immigrants, including Maria Kodama (Jorge Luis Borges’ widow) are retold. 48 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, April 26, 7:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum

Enrique Dussel Peters
"Mexico's Trade: Up Against the Great Wall"

NAFTA helped turn Mexico into an important trading country, but intense competition in the global economy has limited the treaty’s benefits. The greatest threat to Mexico’s position as an export manufacturing economy comes from China, which has already displaced it as the United States’ second largest trade partner. Professor Dussel Peters will discuss the challenges and opportunities facing Mexico in its economic relations with China and the U.S.

Enrique Dussel Peters is Professor of Economics at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. His research focuses on the theory of industrial organization and economic development as well as manufacturing, trade and regional specialization patterns in Latin America and Mexico.

Thursday, April 27, 4:00 pm
223 Moses Hall

Analysis and photos of the event


Laura Vinci
"A Conversation With Laura Vinci and Natalia Brizuela"

Laura Vinci is an accomplished installation artist who lives and works in São Paulo, Brazil. Her work has evolved through several mediums: painting in the 80s, sculpture in the 90s and recently, large scale installations exhibited not only throughout Brazil but in Europe , Australia , the U.S. and Latin America as well. Vinci’s work is part of the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art in São Paulo, the Museum of Fine Arts in Rio de Janeiro and the Brasilia Art Museum, among others.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Friday, April 28, 12:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photo of the event


Denise Arnold
“Social Movements in Bolivia 2000–05: Positioning, Demands and Aftermath”

The 2000 water war in Bolivia marked the beginning of a series of social movements including the coca war, the tax war and finally the massive mobilizations of the gas war which toppled two presidents and led to the presidency of Evo Morales, the leader of the coca growers. Prof. Arnold will analyze the tactics used in the mobilizations, the role of women and the various interpretations of these events. Finally, she will consider the positioning of the movements in light of the upcoming Constituent Assembly, scheduled to begin in August 2006.

Denise Arnold is an international expert in Andean anthropology and a major player in the scholarly and public debate on bilingual education in Bolivia. She is Director of the Instituto de Lengua y Cultura Aymara (ILCA) in La Paz and Research Professor at Birkbeck College , University of London. Her book, El rincón de las cabezas challenges prevalent models of bilingual education and produced a major controversy in Bolivia.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Tuesday, May 2, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos of the event


Panel Discussion
"Brazil and the Global South: Making Global Governance Work"

The economic rules created by global governance institutions like the World Trade Organization and the policy prescriptions of global organizations like the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank have a profound effect on people living in the Global South. Brazil has been a leader among the countries trying to change global rules and policies to the benefit of the South. On Thursday, May 4, the Center for Latin American Studies will host a panel discussion on the future of global economic governance. Peter Evans and Harley Shaiken of UC Berkeley will join in a panel with two Brazilian experts on global governance issues. Jorge Avila has been centrally involved in recent negotiations designed to construct a new global regime for intellectual property. Leonardo Burlamaqui, of the Universidade Cândido Mendes in Rio de Janeiro, is a expert on industrial policy and global finance. They will all participate in debate and discussion, introduced and moderated by John Lie, Dean of International and Area Studies.

- Download a poster for the panel (.pdf)

For more information, you can visit the website for the Multidisciplinary Inter-institutional Network on Development and Strategies.

Thursday, May 4, 4:00 pm
Room 370, Dwinelle Hall
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event


Ricardo Guajardo
“Key Success Factors for Development: Why Economic Liberalism Disappoints So Many in Latin America”

Ricardo Guajardo served as Chief Executive Officer of Grupo Financiero Bancomer, S.A. de C.V. from 1991–99, and Chairman of the Board from 1999–2004. He is currently Chairman of BBVA Holdings in the U.S. and a member of the International Capital Markets Advisory Committee of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York . He also has served as Chairman of the Centro de Estudios Económicos del Sector Privado (CEESP), a private sector think tank on Mexican economic policy.

Co-sponsored by the MBA Latin American and Hispanic Business Students Association.

Friday, May 5, 12:15 – 1:15
230 Cheit Hall, Haas School of Business


Open House
Center for Latin American Studies and Center for Latino Policy Research

The Center for Latino Policy Research and the Center for Latin American Studies are co-sponsoring an open house. Come by to see what's happening at these two great research organizations. CLPR will be offering a guided tour at 4:00 pm, and CLAS will follow at 4:45 pm.

Friday, May 5, 4:00 - 6:00 pm
Center for Latino Policy Research, 2547 Channing Way (corner of Bowditch)
Center for Latin American Studies, 2334 Bowditch Street


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Marisol de la Cadena
Title TBA

Marisol de la Cadena is Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Davis.

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