SPRING 2007 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Elizabeth Dore
“Gendered Memories: Life in the Cuban Revolution”

In 1959 leaders of the Cuban Revolution pledged that the new government would emancipate women from their traditional roles. As one would expect given the time and place, they made no parallel promise to liberate men from machismo. Drawing from her recent work directing the oral history project, Memories of the Cuban Revolution, Elizabeth Dore will explore diverse ways that Cubans portrayed feminine and masculine norms.

Elizabeth Dore is Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Southampton, UK. Myths of Modernity: Peonage and Patriarchy in Nicaragua (Duke University Press) is her most recent book.

Thursday, January 18, 4:00 pm
554 Barrows Hall


Soledad Falabella
“New Technologies and the Crisis of Education and Culture”

Traditional educational and cultural systems in developing countries are in crisis. ESE:O, an organization based in Santiago, Chile, was created to address this problem by improving students’ academic writing and leadership skills. The director of ESE:O, Soledad Falabella, will discuss her experience using local technology to work with people without extensive technological experience in order to introduce and nurture local and global collaboration.

Soledad Falabella is the director ofESE:O and an editor of Hilando en la memoria. Siete mujeres mapuche/poesía, an anthology of Mapuche poetry. She received her Ph.D. in Hispanic Languages and Literatures from UC Berkeley in 2001.

Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Wednesday, January 24, 12:00 pm
Spanish and Portuguese Library, 5125 Dwinelle


Series:
Botero at Berkeley

Abu Ghraib 72

"A Conversation With The Artist"

Fernando Botero
Robert Hass,
Professor of English, UC Berkeley
Poet Laureate of the United States (1995-1997)

Tickets
This event is free and open to the public. Tickets will be distributed at 3:00 pm. First come, first served. The doors will open at 3:30 pm. We ask that patrons are in their seats by 3:50 pm.

A webcast is available.

Monday, January 29, 4:00 pm
Chevron Auditorium, International House
(map)

Photos of the event
Article about the event from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Series:
Botero at Berkeley

Abu Ghraib 67

Fernando Botero, the most famous living Latin American artist, will display his Abu Ghraib paintings at the University of California, Berkeley.

These 47 paintings and drawings belong to a long tradition of artistic statements against war and violence that include Goya's Caprichos and Picasso's Guernica.

Organized by the Center for Latin American Studies, these paintings have never been displayed in a public institution in the United States. The exhibit was "proposed to many museums in the U.S," according to the artist, but all declined to show it.

More information-->

Opening with Mr. Botero:
Monday, January 29, at 6:00 pm

Photos of the opening

Exhibition Hours and Location
Room 190, Doe Library
(map)
January 29 – March 23, 2007
Monday – Thursday: 10:00 am – 7:00 pm
Friday – Saturday: 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Closed on Sundays

Works from the exhibit from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies
Article about bringing the exhibit to Berkeley


Series:
Botero at Berkeley

Abu Ghraib 66

"Art and Violence"

T.J. Clark is the George C. and Helen N. Pardee Chair, and a Professor of Art History at UC Berkeley.
Thomas W. Laqueur is the Helen Fawcett Professor of History at UC Berkeley.
Francine Masiello is the Sidney and Margaret Ancker Distinguished Professor in the Humanities and a member of the Departments of Spanish and Portuguese and Comparative Literature at UC Berkeley.

- Webcast of the event

Wednesday, January 31, 4:00 pm
Morrison Library, Doe Library
(map)

Analysis and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Charles Briggs and Clara Mantini-Briggs
“Social Movements, Cuban Doctors and New Definitions of ‘the Political’ in Venezuela”


In 2003, Venezuelan barrio residents turned spare rooms into clinics for Cuban doctors, thereby inaugurating both an innovative social movement and one of the most innovative and successful experiments in confronting health disparities. This lecture examines how Latin American radical health scholars, revolutionary politics and a president-cum-health educator — Hugo Chávez — transformed health into a key political arena.

Charles L. Briggs, Professor of Anthropology at UC Berkeley, is writing a book on urban violence in Venezuela and conducting research on news media in Cuba , Mexico , the United States and Venezuela . Clara Mantini-Briggs, a Venezuelan public health physician and Associate Researcher in the Department of Demography at UC Berkeley, is researching health and empowerment in Misión Barrio Adentro. Their joint publication, Stories in the Time of Cholera: Racial Profiling during a Medical Nightmare, won the 2004 Bryce Wood Book Award from the Latin American Studies Association.

Monday, February 5, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Article about and photos of the event


Torcuato S. Di Tella
"The Argentine Political System: The Evolution of Peronism"

By comparing Argentina, Chile and Brazil it is possible to detect some evolutionary tendencies in the region. Chile’s "classical" dichotomy between left and right contrasts with Argentina where the right posts lackluster election results and Peronism rose up in lieu of social democracy. In Brazil the demise of Varguismo is in contrast to the permanence, though transformed, of Peronism in Argentina. The social structures of these three countries will be analyzed as explanatory factors.

The Argentine sociologist Torcuato S. Di Tella is Professor Emeritus of the University of Buenos Aires, specializing in the comparative study of Latin American political systems. Some of his books include Latin American Politics (2nd ed.), 2001; National Popular Politics in Early Independent Mexico, 1996; and History of Political Parties in Twentieth Century Latin America, 2004

Monday, February 5, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women’s Faculty Club

Article about and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Adrian Hearn
“China’s Engagement with Latin America: Economic and Political Implications”

The strengthening of economic and political relations with China poses both opportunities and challenges for Latin America. China’s emergence as the world’s second largest consumer of natural resources has favored resource rich countries such as Brazil, Chile, Cuba, Peru and Venezuela. However, exporters of manufactured goods, such as Mexico and Central America, have fared considerably less well. Latin American political reactions to engagement with China have been similarly diverse, from recognition of the latter as a valued protagonist of "South-South" cooperation to public concern about an emerging "China Threat" to the region.

Adrian Hearn is a postdoctoral research fellow in the Institute for International Studies at the University of Technology, Sydney.

Co-sponsored with the Center for Chinese Studies.

Wednesday, February 7, 12:00 pm
3401 Dwinelle Hall

Article and photo of the event


Series:
Cine Latino

Maquilapolis, by Vicky Funari and Sergio De La Torre (2006)

Directors Vicky Funari and Sergio De La Torre gave Tijuana factory workers a six-week video workshop, lent them cameras and gave them free rein in presenting their lives. The resulting film dispenses with the pitying formula of many labor-centered documentaries, instead presenting intelligent women awakening to their rights and doing something about it. 68 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Director Vicky Funari and Co-producer (and UCB alumnus) Annelise Wunderlich will introduce the movie and answer questions after the showing.

Wednesday, February 7, 7:00 pm
Room 160, Kroeber Hall
(map)

Article about and photos of the event


Kjeld Jakobsen
“Challenges for the Brazilian Trade Union Movement”

Lula’s government has pushed through several new initiatives addressing economic, labor and social issues. In this talk, Kjeld Jakobsen will analyze the effects these initiatives have had on the unions’ base.

Kjeld Jakobsen was a member of the Central Unica dos Trabalhadores (CUT) Executive for 12 years, nine of them as Secretary for International Relations. Currently, he is the International Consultant and Chair of the Social Observatory Institute and the municipality of São Paulo’s International Secretary.

Thursday, February 8, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Article about and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Series:
Cine Latino

Rosario Tijeras, by Emilio Maillé (2005)

Set amid the drug violence of 1980s Medellín, the Colombian box office smash “Rosario Tijeras” tells the story of a violent, violated woman from the city’s slums and the two upper-class youths who are seduced by her mystery and tragedy. 126 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Please note: This movie contains mature subject matter, and may not be suitable for all viewers.

Wednesday, February 21, 7:00 pm
Room 160, Kroeber Hall (map)


Conference
"Beyond Visibility: Rethinking the African Diaspora in Latin America"

Organized by the AfroLatino Working Group at CLAS, this conference will bring together new scholarship and thinking on race, ethnicity, culture, society, economy, politics and nation in the context of the African diaspora in Latin America.

Download a flier for the conference (.pdf)-->
Download a flier for the opening reception (.pdf) -->

For more information-->

March 1-2
Heller Room, ASUC Building / Lipman Room, Barrows Hall


Alberto Blanco
"On the Labor of Poets"

Alberto Blanco will discuss the poem “Madrigal” by Octavio Paz and read his poem “Más transparente.

Poet and musician Alberto Blanco was born in Mexico City in 1951. He is the author of over 20 books including works of poetry, short stories and children’s books.

Friday, March 2, 12:00-1:30 pm
370 Dwinelle Hall


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Myrna Santiago
“The Ecology of Oil: Labor, Environment and the Mexican Revolution, 1900-1938”

Veracruz, Mexico’s first oil-producing state, set the pattern for oil exploitation in the rest of the country. Professor Santiago will discuss the social and environmental effects of oil production in northern Veracruz during the early 20th century when the industry was owned by American and European companies.

Myrna Santiago earned her Ph.D. in History at UC Berkeley in 1997. She has lectured at UC Berkeley and at Mills College and is now Associate Professor of History at St. Mary’s College and Director of the Women’s Studies Program.

Monday, March 5, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Article about and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Gustavo Esteva and Sergio Beltrán
"Oaxaca, the APPO and the Alternative Media"

The Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (APPO in Spanish) coalesced in response to police repression against a strike by the Oaxacan teachers’ union and occupied the city of Oaxaca from July to November 2006. Gustavo Esteva and Sergio Beltrán will discuss the conflict as well as the strategic use of the alternative media by this grassroots social movement and the Mexican government.

Gustavo Esteva is a Mexican political analyst and the founder of Universidad de la Tierra in Oaxaca, Mexico. Sergio Beltrán is a researcher at the Universidad de la Tierra and has worked extensively in alternative radio production. Both participated in last year’s debates of the Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca.

Co-sponsored by the Townsend Center and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Monday, March 5, 4:00 pm
Spanish & Portuguese Library, 5125 Dwinelle Hall

Photos of the event


Series:
Botero at Berkeley

Abu Ghraib 74

"Torture, Human Rights and Terrorism"

Aryeh Neier is the President of the Open Society Institute and an Adjunct Professor of Law at New York University.
José Zalaquett is the president of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and a Professor of Law and co-director of the Human Rights Center at the University of Chile’s Law School.
Jenny S. Martinez argued the 2004 case Rumsfeld v. Padilla before the U.S. Supreme Court and is an Associate Professor of Law at Stanford University.
Philip Zimbardo is the former President of the American Psychological Association, Professor Emeritus of Psychology at Stanford University, and the author of The Lucifer Effect: Why Good People Turn Evil.

- Webcast of this event

Wednesday, March 7, 4:00 pm
Booth Auditorium, Boalt Hall School of Law
(map)

Article about and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Series:
Cine Latino

Madeinusa, by Claudia Llosa (2005)

Andean beauty Madeinusa falls in love with a man from Lima stranded in her village on the cusp of Holy Days: the time from Good Friday until Easter Sunday when, according to village tradition, God is dead and sin does not exist. 103 minutes. Spanish and Quechua with English subtitles.

Wednesday, March 7, 7:00 pm
Room 160, Kroeber Hall (map)


Alfred Arteaga
"On the Labor of Poets"

Alfred Arteaga will discuss “San Pedro Nolasco” a villancio by Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and read his poem “Inspiración.”

Alfred Arteaga is a poet and an associate professor of Ethnic Studies at UC Berkeley.

Thursday, March 8, 9:30 – 11:00 am
79 Dwinelle Hall


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Maria Echaveste
“Hispanics, Immigration and Politics”

Nationwide, 69 percent of Hispanics supported Democratic candidates in the 2006 election, an increase of more than 10 percent from 2004. Did the Republican strategy of focusing on illegal immigration result in a loss of Hispanic support? Or were there other reasons that explain the gains made by Democrats among Hispanics? Can Democrats count on the Hispanic vote in the upcoming elections?

Maria Echaveste is Lecturer in Residence at Berkeley’s Boalt Hall School of Law and the cofounder of the Nueva Vista Group, a consulting firm. She served as Deputy Chief of Staff in the Clinton White House from 1998–2001.

- Webcast of this event

Monday, March 12, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club

Article about and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Tinker Summer Field Research Symposium

This two-day symposium is a unique opportunity to learn about the current research done by UC Berkeley graduate students who spent last summer in Latin America. Field research grants were provided by CLAS with the generous support of the Tinker Foundation.

Wednesday, March 14, 1:00 – 4:00 pm and
Thursday, March 15, 1:00 – 3:45 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Photos and schedule of presentations


Cynthia Feliciano
"Unequal Origins: Immigrant Selectivity and Educational Mobility Among Second-Generation Latinos"

Cynthia Feliciano is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Chicano/Latino Studies at UC Irvine. Her research interests include race and ethnicity, minority relations, migration and immigration and education. She recently published Unequal Origins: Immigrant Selection and the Education of the Second Generation. Her current research focuses on Mexican immigration and the determinants of ethnic differences in educational achievement.

Co-sponsored with the Center for Latino Policy Research.

Friday, March 16, 3:00 - 5:00 pm
Center for Latino Policy Research, 2547 Channing Way (at Bowditch)


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Irene Bloemraad
“Learning the Political Ropes: Civic and Political Learning in Mixed Status Mexican Origin Families”


Professor Bloemraad will discuss preliminary findings from the ongoing Mexican American Political Socialization Project which asks U.S.-born adolescents and their Mexican-origin parents about civic and political engagement. Key questions include the degree to which children help their parents become involved and informed about American political and civic life and whether children’s own activities differ based on their parents’ legal status.

Irene Bloemraad is Assistant Professor of Sociology at UC Berkeley. She is the author of Becoming a Citizen: Incorporating Immigrants and Refugees in the United States and Canada and specializes in comparative immigration and citizenship.

Monday, March 19, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Article about and photos of the event


Pablo Salazar Mendiguchía
"Chiapas: A New Beginning"

In 2000, Pablo Salazar Mendiguchía was elected governor of Chiapas after uniting a surprising coalition of parties from across the political spectrum to defeat the perennial incumbent — the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI). The first protestant to be elected governor of a Mexican state in modern times, he ran on a platform that advocated change for the region based on tolerance, education and rule of law. On leaving office in 2006, Salazar pointed to the fact that Chiapas was no longer in the news as evidence of the success of his term in office.

This event will held in Spanish with English translation.

Wednesday, March 21, 4:00 pm
Homeroom, International House

Photos of the event


Series:
Cine Latino

Inti-Illimani Esencial: La fuerza de la música, by Ricardo Larraín (2006)

Filmed during a four-day period in July 2006, this documentary captures Inti-Illimani Histórico at work recording their recently released CD “Esencial.”
120 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Wednesday, March 21, 7:00pm
Room 160, Kroeber Hall (map)


Manda Bala
Directed by Jason Kohn (2006)

Brazil is known for its beautiful beaches, lush rain forests and vibrant culture. However, in recent years, the country has also developed a reputation for corrupt politicians, kidnapping and plastic surgery. “Manda Bala” (“Send a Bullet”) artfully connects these seemingly disparate elements and conducts a dazzling, yet harrowing, examination of the tragic domino effect that has reshaped the face of the country and created an entire industry built on corruption.

First-time director Jason Kohn will introduce and take questions about his film, which won the 2007 Sundance Grand Jury Prize as a stylish and hard-hitting documentary. English and Portuguese with English subtitles. 85 minutes.

Friday, March 23, 7:00 pm
Andersen Auditorium, Haas School of Business

Article about and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Series:
Cine Latino

The Private Archives of Pablo Escobar, by Marc de Beaufort (2002)

Viewed as a modern-day Robin Hood by some and a ruthless criminal by others, Pablo Escobar and his narco-empire changed the face of Colombia. This film — told from the view point of those closest to him, using intimate family footage — offers a rare glimpse into the daily life of the drug kingpin.
70 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Award-winning Colombian journalist Daniel Coronell will introduce the movie and answer questions after the showing.

Wednesday, April 4, 7:00 pm
Room 160, Kroeber Hall (map)

Photo of the event


Nancy Scheper-Hughes
"The Ghosts of Montes de Oca: Naked Life, Torture and the Medically Disappeared"

Between 1976 and 1991, 1400 patients at Montes de Oca, Argentina’s national mental asylum for the profoundly “mentally deficient,” disappeared. Another 1350 died, many inexplicably. Cecilia Giubileo, a young psychiatrist who planned to expose the institutional abuses related to the disappearances and deaths, was among the disappeared. Nancy Scheper-Hughes will discuss the asylum’s recent history and address the question of how medical personnel entrusted with the care of the most vulnerable patients could justify a regime of malignant abuse in one of the most psychiatrically sophisticated countries in the world.

Nancy Scheper-Hughes is Professor of Anthropology at UC Berkeley. She is best known for her award-winning books Saints, Scholars and Schizophrenics: Mental Illness in Rural Ireland and Death without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil. She was given the Berkeley William Sloane Coffin Jr. Award for moral leadership on April 4, 2007.

Wednesday, April 11, 4:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

- Webcast of this event

Article about and photos of the event


Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Daniel Alarcón
“Lost City Radio”

Set in a nameless, timeless South American country slowly emerging from a long civil war, Daniel Alarcón’s first novel, Lost City Radio probes the deepest questions of war: from its devastating impact on society to the emotional scarring each participant, observer and survivor carries with them for years. Mr. Alarcón will give a short reading from his novel and talk about the genesis of the project.

Daniel Alarcón was named a Guggenheim Fellow for Fiction on April 6, 2007, and his story collection War by Candlelight was a finalist for the 2006 PEN/Hemingway Award. He is Associate Editor of Etiqueta Negra, an award-winning arts and culture magazine published in his native Lima, Peru. His first novel, Lost City Radio, was published in February 2007.

- Streaming audio archive of this event
- Download a podcast (.mp3) of this event (right click to download)
- First chapter of Lost City Radio (from the New York Times)

Monday April 16, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club

Article about and photos of the event
Article from the Berkeley Review of Latin American Studies


Film Screening
"No End in Sight"
Directed by Charles Ferguson (2006)

On May 1, 2003, President Bush declared that major combat operations in Iraq had ended.  Almost four years later, 3,000 American soldiers and tens of thousands of Iraqi civilians are dead, and Iraq still burns. What happened? Drawing on surprisingly frank interviews with an impressive array of high-level government officials, military personnel and journalists, Charles Ferguson zeroes in on the months immediately before and after the toppling of Saddam in this riveting film. English. 102 minutes.

Charles Ferguson is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a director of the French-American Foundation and CEO of Representational Pictures. A senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, Ferguson is also cofounder of Vermeer Technologies, the developers of FrontPage. "No End in Sight" is his first film.

The director will introduce the film and answer questions after the showing.

Reactions to the film from Latin America-->

Monday, April 16, 7:00 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way

Photos from the screening


Series:
Cine
Latino

Antonia, by Tata Amaral (2006)

“Antonia” chronicles the ups and downs of a group of female rappers from the outskirts of São Paulo. Their love of performing and creating music together — despite the many obstacles presented by being poor, black and female in the male-dominated rap world — is inspiring.
90 minutes. Portuguese with English subtitles.

Wednesday, April 18, 7:00 pm
Room 160, Kroeber Hall (map)


Series:
Cine Latino

The Private Archives of Pablo Escobar, by Marc de Beaufort (2002)

Pablo Escobar and his narco-empire changed the face of Colombia. This film — told from the view point of those closest to him, using intimate family footage — offers a rare glimpse into the daily life of the drug kingpin.
70 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Repeat Screening
Thursday, April 19, 7:00 pm

CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Symposium
Andean Modernities: Trade, Tourism, Technology

This symposium brings together four Andeanist scholars offering diverse perspectives on the character and development of modernity in the Andes.

Marcia Stephenson, Associate Professor of Spanish and Women’s Studies at Purdue University, “ The Trans-Atlantic Trade of Andean Bezoar Stones”

Joy Logan, Associate Professor of Spanish at the University of Hawaii, Manoa, “Adventure, Mountaineering and Modernity in the Central Andes of Argentina”

Jorge Coronado, Assistant Professor of Spanish and Portuguese at Northwestern University, “Snapshots of Andean Modernities: Martín Chambi and the Limits of Lettered Indigenismo”

Guillermo Delgado, Lecturer of Latin American and Latino Studies at UC Santa Cruz, “Andean Indigeneity as Epistemic Dis/juncture of Global Modernity”

Co-sponsored by the Department of Spanish and Portuguese and the Townsend Center for the Humanities.

Friday, April 20, 2:00 – 6:00 pm
5125 Dwinelle Hall


Emilio Tojín
"Justice for Genocide in Guatemala"

The Association for Truth and Justice continues to lead efforts to bring former military leaders, including former dictator Gen. Ríos Montt, to justice. Simultaneous legal proceedings in Guatemala and Spain are seeking to hold former military leaders accountable for genocide and other gross human rights abuses in the 1980s.

Emilio Tojín, a leader from the Association for Justice and Reconciliation, is a K'iche' Maya from Guatemala.

Co-sponsored by the Departments of Ethnic Studies, Native American Studies, Chicano/Latino Studies and Anthropology.

Tuesday, April 24, 4:00 pm
Department of Ethnic Studies, 554 Barrows Hall

Article about and photos of the event


Rafael Sánchez
"Seized by the Spirit: The Mystical Foundation of Squatting Among Pentecostals in Caracas Today"


Rafael Sánchez was a Research Fellow at the University of Amsterdam, Netherlands, from 2003-06. He has carried out extensive field and archival research in Venezuela and published on media, mass politics, populism, and spirit mediumship. Currently, he is a Fellow at New York University's Center for Religion and Media where he is completing his book Dancing Jacobins: Governmental Monumentality and the Genealogy of Latin American Populism (Venezuela 1810-2007), under contract with Stanford University Press. His current project "The Fate of Sovereignty in the Landscape of the City" focuses on popular imagination and territorializing projects in contemporary urban Venezuela within the context of the Chávez regime.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

POSTPONED


Juan Guzmán
"Human Rights in Chile: Then and Now"

A memorial to campesinos killed in Lonquén.
(photo by Rodolfo Palominos)

Despite the death of former dictator Augusto Pinochet and the work of the National Commission on Political Imprisonment and Torture, Chilean efforts to end impunity remain mixed. Although some of the dictator's former henchmen have been indicted, more than 20 military officers complicit in Chile's Dirty War remain unpunished. Judge Juan Guzmán will discuss the state of human rights 17 years after Pinochet's dictatorship.

Judge Juan Guzmán spent seven years overseeing the Chilean case against Pinochet and is
Dean and Professor of Procedural Law and Professional Ethics at the Universidad Central de Chile School of Law.

Monday, May 7, 7:00 pm
Women's Faculty Club Lounge

Article about and photos of the event


Bernardo Alvarez Herrera speaking at Berkeley in October 2003.

Bernardo Alvarez Herrera
"Venezuela-U.S. Relations & the Bolivarian Revolution"

Although recent rhetoric from the Bush and Chávez administrations suggests that the relationship between the U.S. and Venezuela is tense, Venezuela remains one of the top exporters of petroleum and crude oil to the United States. Ambassador Alvarez Herrera will discuss how close trade relations and the Bolivarian Revolution influence the U.S.-Venezuela relationship.

Bernardo Alvarez Herrera is Venezuela's Ambassador to the United States and the former head of the Venezuelan delegation to OPEC.

Tuesday, May 8, 4:00 pm
Room Changed to Ethnic Studies Conference Room, 554 Barrows Hall

Photos of the event

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