SPRING 2012 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Lake Merritt at Night, by Hitchster

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Marta Rodriguez de Assis Machado
“Punishing Gender Violence: Brazil’s ‘Maria da Penha Law’”

In August 2006, a statute against domestic and gender violence (the “Maria da Penha Law”) was promulgated in Brazil. The result of a four-year negotiation between Congress and a consortium of NGOs and activists, the statute was a turning point for how the Brazilian legal system treats women and gender-based violence. However, the new law remains controversial due to its emphasis on incarceration. In her talk, Machado will discuss the law and its application, exploring its ambiguous results.

Marta Rodriguez de Assis Machado is a professor of Law at the Fundação Getulio Vargas in São Paulo and a researcher at the Centro Brasileiro de Análise e Planejamento (CEBRAP). Her research focuses on the increase in criminalization and incarceration in Brazil. She is currently a visiting scholar at CLAS.

Monday, January 23, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street

Article about and photos of the event


La Mirada Invisible, Cine Latino Spring 2012

Series:
Cine Latino

The Invisible Eye
Directed by Diego Lerman (Argentina, 2010)

Set in 1982 during the last days of the military government, this moody drama follows a repressed assistant teacher at an elite Argentine private school who accepts unquestioningly the school’s rigid code of conduct and identification with the nation state. But the headmaster’s warning about the “cancer of subversion” and the need for total surveillance soon feed an obsession with one of her students, precipitating a spiral of degradation and disciplinary breakdown that parallels a popular rebellion beyond the school’s walls. 95 minutes. Spanish with English subtitles.

Classy production values and a knockout lead.” —Variety

Wednesday, January 25, 7:00 pm
141 McCone Hall


Lake Merritt at Night, by Hitchster

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Seth M. Holmes
“Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Indigenous Mexican Farmworkers in the U.S.”

Migration, social hierarchies, health disparities, race and medicine intersect along the transit routes between the United States and Mexico. Dr. Holmes spent 18 months conducting in-depth fieldwork while living, working and migrating with indigenous Mexican farmworkers in both the United States and Mexico. In this talk, he will focus on the ways in which social and health inequalities come to be understood as normal and natural. 

Seth M. Holmes is the Martin Sisters Endowed Chair and Assistant Professor of Health and Social Behavior at UC Berkeley’s School of Public Health. He received the Rudolf Virchow Critical Anthropology of Global Health Award for an article based on this project and is currently completing a book on the same topic.

Monday, February 6, 12:00 pm
554 Barrows Hall


La Mirada Invisible, Cine Latino Spring 2012

Series:
Cine Latino

Lula, Son of Brazil
Directed by Fábio Barreto (Brazil, 2009)

Brazil’s submission to the 2011 Academy Awards chronicles the arduous transformation of a penniless child of the slums to a man on the brink of greatness. Adapted from Denise Parana’s biography of the same name, “Lula, Son of Brazil” is a tribute to Luis Inácio Lula da Silva, who rose from the poverty of northeastern Brazil to become president of the world’s fifth most populous nation. 130 minutes. Portuguese with English subtitles.

Wednesday, February 8, 7:00 pm
141 McCone Hall


US-Mexico Futures Forum, Fall 2011

Series:
U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum

Alma Guillermoprieto
72 Migrantes

In August 2010, a lone survivor directed authorities to a ranch in the Mexican state of Tamaulipas where 72 Central and South American migrants lay unburied, massacred by narcotraffickers. Moved by these cruel and anonymous deaths, Alma Guillermoprieto mobilized a group of journalists, activists and writers to gather information about those who had died and create a “virtual altar” for each of them online. The result was 72migrantes.com, which was compiled in a book of the same name and released in fall 2011. In her talk, Guillermoprieto will discuss the 72 migrantes project as well as the current state of Central American immigration and the drug trade in Mexico.

Alma Guillermoprieto is an award-winning journalist and author. In 2008, Foreign Policy magazine named her one of the 100 most important public intellectuals in the world.

Thursday, February 9, 4:00 pm
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall

Article by Ms. Guillermoprieto about "72 Migrantes"


Alex Harris
The Idea of Cuba

(Photo by Alex Harris, from the book The Idea of Cuba, 2007, University of New Mexico Press.)

Photographer Alex Harris traveled to Cuba with one purpose in mind: to take photographs that would evoke the tangled relationship between Cuba and the United States.  But once on the island, Harris became fascinated by all the statues of José Martí and began to immerse himself in Martí's writings and ideas. On subsequent trips, Harris considered Martí's ideas about the ideal Cuban nation as a foil for his own photographs of contemporary life on the island.

Alex Harris is a professor of the Practice of Public Policy and Documentary Studies at Duke University and the author of 14 books including The Idea of Cuba, (2007), University of New Mexico Press. His photographs have been collected and exhibited widely, most recently at the J. Paul Getty Museum for the exhibition: “A Revolutionary Project, Cuba from Walker Evans to Now.”

Thursday, February 16, 4:00 pm
Lounge, Women's Faculty Club


Evelio Rosero
A Public Reading of "La carroza de Bolivar"

2012 Regent's Lecturer Evelio Rosero, one of Colombia’s most prominent novelists and the award-wining writer of The Armies, will be reading from his work La carroza de Bolivar (Tusquests, 2012).

Co-sponsored with the Regents of the University of California and the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

Wednesday, February 22, 5:00 pm
Spanish and Portuguese Library, 5125 Dwinelle Hall


Tinker Summer Field Research Symposium

This symposium is a unique opportunity to learn about the current research done by UC Berkeley graduate students who spent last summer in Latin America. Field research grants were provided by CLAS with the generous support of the Tinker Foundation.

Schedule of presentations

Thursday-Friday, February 23-24, 2:00 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


2012 Regent’s Lecturer, Evelio Rosero
In conversation with Laura García Moreno and Juliana Martinez

Evelio Rosero, one of Colombia’s most prominent novelists and the award-wining author of The Armies, will hold a public conversation with scholars Laura Garcia-Moreno (SFSU)
and Juliana Martinez (UCB). Rosero is well known for his keen and bleak renditions of Colombia’s violent reality. His most recent book, La Carroza de Bolívar, presents a polemic reflection on Latin America’s most powerful mythic figure, Simón Bolívar. 

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish and Portuguese

Thursday, February 23, 5:00 pm 
Geballe Room, 220 Stephens Hall


La Mirada Invisible, Cine Latino Spring 2012

Series:
Cine Latino

“A Better Life”
Directed by Chris Weitz (United States, 2011)

Image from "A Better Life"
Demián Bechir in "A Better Life."
(© 2011 Summit Entertainment, LLC.)

Mexican actor Demián Bichir has been nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor (2012) for his role in “A Better Life,” which critics have given stellar reviews.  Bichir stars as Carlos, an unassuming, hard-working undocumented East L.A. gardener who wants above all to provide his American-born son with a better life. The New York Times praises the authenticity of the film for showing Los Angeles as “the real deal instead of a tourist’s postcard” commenting that “in one memorable scene Carlos rides in a truck and watches as its richly diverse, multi-everything population races by.” 110 minutes. English and Spanish.

“It’s straight, true and heartbreaking, a masterstroke of raw emotional minimalism.” — Amy Biancolli, The Houston Chronicle

The film will be followed by a discussion with director Chris Weitz.

Tuesday, February 28, 6:30 pm
145 Dwinelle Hall

Video of the discussion and photos of the event


Lake Merritt at Night, by Hitchster

Series:
Bay Area Latin America Forum

Martin Carnoy
“Triumph of the BRICs? Higher Education Expansion in the Developing World and the Changing Global Economy”

Martin Carnoy is the Vida Jacks Professor of Education at Stanford University and a consultant to many organizations, including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank and the OECD. A labor economist with a special interest in the relationship between the economy and the educational system, he is currently launching comparative projects on the quality of education in Latin America and Southern Africa, which include assessing teacher knowledge in mathematics, filming classrooms and assessing student performance. He is also working on a major new project to study changes in university financing and the quality of engineering and science education at the university level in China, India and Russia.

Monday, March 5, 12:00 – 1:15 pm
370 Dwinelle Hall

Video, photos and article about the event


Panel Discussion
Torture as the Negation of the Other

Chile’s Museum of Memory will display paintings and drawings from Fernando Botero’s Abu Ghraib series between March 15 and June 24, 2012. The Center for Latin American Studies was a key facilitator of the exhibit, and is pleased to announce that the panel discussion inaugurating the exhibit will be made available on our website. The panel features Chilean notables and Berkeley faculty who will discuss Botero’s work in the context of the history of human rights in Chile specifically, and in Latin America and the broader world more generally.

Participants:
Chris Edley, Dean, Berkeley Law School
Eduardo Vio Grossi, Judge, Inter-American Court of Human Rights
José Zalaquett, Lawyer and Co-Director, Human Rights Center, University of Chile

Video available here:

http://www.museodelamemoria.cl/actividad/foro-panel-la-tortura-como-negacion-del-otro-en-el-marco-de-la-exposicion-botero-abu-ghraib/


La Mirada Invisible, Cine Latino Spring 2012

Series:
Cine Latino

"Dreaming Nicaragua"
Directed by Marcelo Bukin (Nicaragua, United States, Spain, 2010)

“Dreaming Nicaragua” is a sensitive portrayal of four Nicaraguan children living in extreme poverty. The film takes us beyond their hardships and gives voice to the children, who are surprisingly funny, hopeful and optimistic. A traveling art teacher provides a safe arena for the unlikely protagonists to express their innermost thoughts. When painting, the children momentarily leave behind the stress of their daily lives, escaping into a world of dreams and ideas.

Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPianvH3iqw

The film will be followed by a discussion with Christina Falck, Vice President of the Fabretto Children’s Foundation, which helped produce the film.

Co-sponsored with the Graduate School of Education.

Thursday, March 22, 6:30 pm
North Gate Hall 105


Symposium
Quinto Sol Remembered

Quinta Sol Remembered

The publishing house Quinto Sol was established in 1967 by Octavio Romano with the goal of bringing Chicano literature to the forefront of American culture. The materials it published were crucial in the consolidation of Chicanos Studies Departments in California and throughout the Southwest. This seminar celebrates Quinto Sol’s lasting impact through a series of panel discussions with celebrated scholars and artists.

Speakers include: Alurista, Rudolfo Anaya, Héctor Calderón, Juan Carrillo, Lucha Corpi, Lorna Dee Cervantes, Sergio Elizondo, Malaquías Montoya, Edel Romay, Rosaura Sánchez, Alex Saragoza, Gustavo Segade, and Nick Vaca.

Co-sponsored by Chicano Studies; the Center for Latin American Studies; the Arts & Humanities Division; the ASUC Senate; the Townsend Center for the Humanities; the Departments of Ethnic Studies, History, and Spanish & Portuguese; the Graduate Assembly; Prof. Genaro Padilla; the Social Sciences Division; and Student Opportunity Funds.

For more information, please see: http://quintosolremembered.wordpress.com/

Friday, April 6, 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall


La Mirada Invisible, Cine Latino Spring 2012

Series:
Cine Latino

Image from "A Better Life"
Demián Bechir in "A Better Life."
(© 2011 Summit Entertainment, LLC.)

“A Better Life”
Directed by Chris Weitz (United States, 2011)

Mexican actor Demián Bichir has received a Best Actor Oscar nomination for his role in “A Better Life,” which critics have compared to the Italian classic “The Bicycle Thief.” Bichir stars as Carlos, an undocumented East L.A. gardener who buys a truck with borrowed money in order to further his business and provide his American-born son with a better life. When the truck is stolen, the two set out on a quest to get it back that brings them closer even as it threatens Carlos’ tentative hold on the American Dream. 110 minutes. English and Spanish.

“It’s straight, true and heartbreaking, a masterstroke of raw emotional minimalism.” — Amy Biancolli, The Houston Chronicle

The film will be followed by a screening of the discussion CLAS hosted with director Chris Weitz at UC Berkeley on February 28, 2012.

Tuesday, April 17, 6:30 pm
2040 Valley Life Sciences Building


La Mirada Invisible, Cine Latino Spring 2012

Series:
Cine Latino

“Tejid@s Junt@s (Stitched Together): Workers, Students, and the Movement for Alta Gracia”
Directed by Will Delphia, 2012

“Tejid@s Junt@s” is a short film about the development of a strong and independent union in the Alta Gracia apparel factory in the Dominican Republic. The film tells the story of workers, conscientious investors, and student activists who participated in making Alta Gracia a fair alternative to unsafe working conditions, low wages, and repressive work environments. The film examines the myriad ways that communities in the United States are interwoven with communities abroad and shows how finding and strengthening those connections can bring about positive change. 25 minutes. English and Spanish with subtitles.

The film will be followed by a streamed question and answer session with the filmmaker Rachel Taber and workers from the Alta Gracia factory.

Trailer: http://tejidxs.tumblr.com/

Wednesday, April 18, 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
CLAS Conference Room, 2334 Bowditch Street


Luiz Ruffato
“Violência: a nova imagem exótica do Brasil”

The award-winning author Luiz Ruffato has been credited with no less a feat than revitalizing Brazilian literature. Ruffato made his literary debut in 1998 with Histórias de remorsos e rancores. His first novel Eles eram muitos cavalos, published in 2001, examined daily life in São Paulo and received the  Prêmio Machado de Assis and the Prêmio Associação Paulista de Críticos de Arte.
Currently, Ruffato is working on a five volume cycle titled Inferno provisorio that documents the industrialization of Brazil beginning in the 1950s and serving as the Distinguished Brazilian Writer in Residence at UC Berkeley.

Co-sponsored with the Department of Spanish & Portuguese.

Please note that this talk will be held in Portuguese.

Friday, April 20, 1:00 – 2:00 pm
5125 Dwinelle Hall, Spanish & Portuguese Library


US-Mexico Futures Forum, Fall 2011

Series:
U.S.-Mexico Futures Forum

Denise Dresser
“Mexico 2012 and Beyond”

Mexico faces a presidential election in which the former ruling party, the PRI, may return to power. The talk will examine the reasons behind the “Putinization” of Mexico: the possibility of political regression due to the lack of substantive change over the last 12 years of National Action Party (PAN) rule. Dresser will focus on the main candidates and their campaign dynamics as well as on the implications of a PRI win in the context of the country's “war on drugs.” She will also address the structural factors that have made democratic consolidation and economic reforms difficult to carry out, turning Mexico into a country that seems condemned to subpar economic performance.

Denise Dresser is a professor of political science at the Instituto Tecnológico de México (ITAM), where she has taught since 1991. She writes a political column for the Mexican newspaper Reforma and the news weekly Proceso and won Mexico’s National Journalism Award in 2010.

Friday, April 27, 12:00 pm
International House Home Room

YouTube video and photos of the event


Deborah Yashar
“Violence: The Illicit, the Complicit, and Competition in Contemporary Latin America”

Contemporary Latin America arguably suffers from some of the world’s highest homicide rates. Despite transitions from authoritarian rule and the apparent decline in human rights abuses, violence remains a critical political and social issue. Yashar will analyze the temporality and geography of violence in contemporary Latin America. Based on ongoing research — including fieldwork, GSI mapping, and an original newspaper database — she will discuss the interaction between illicit economies, complicit states, and territorial competition.

Deborah Yashar is a professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University and co-director of the Project on Democracy and Development. Her current research focuses on the contemporary rise in violent crime and the uneven record of Latin America’s third wave democracies to provide public security and rule of law.

Monday, April 30, 12:00 pm
554 Barrows Hall

Video and photos of the event


Thad Dunning
Race, Class, and Representation in Brazil


What accounts for the persistent racial gap between Brazilian citizens and their elected officials? Potential explanations include behavioral as well as institutional and resource-based theories. Dunning presents new evidence from an experiment in which the race and stated class background of political candidates giving otherwise identical speeches were varied at random. The study found some class effects but no discernible effects related to the candidates’ race. The talk will conclude with an exploration of other factors that might help to explain the representational divide. 

Thad Dunning is an associate professor of Political Science at Yale University and a research fellow at Yale’s Whitney and Betty Macmillan Center for International and Area Studies as well as the Institution for Social and Policy Studies. His current work on ethnic and other cleavages draws from field work in Latin America, India, and Africa.
 
Wednesday, May 2, 12:00 pm
554 Barrows Hall

Video and photos of the event


Ben Ross Schneider
“Hierarchical Capitalism and the Low Skill Trap in Latin America”

Much of Latin America suffers from a low skill trap characterized by a scarcity of good jobs and low investment in human capital. Understanding this trap requires an analysis of labor market dynamics such as informality and high turnover as well as the corporate strategies of multinational corporations and diversified business groups.

Ben Ross Schneider is the Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT and director of the MIT–Brazil and MIT–Chile programs. His books include Reinventing Leviathan: The Politics of Administrative Reform in Developing Countries and Business Politics and the State in 20th Century Latin America. Schneider’s current research includes projects on public–private partnerships, industrial policy and quasi-markets in education.

Wednesday, May 2, 5:00 pm
223 Moses Hall

Video and photos of the event

 

© 2012, The Regents of the University of California, Last Updated - June 15, 2012