CLAS Summer Institute for Teachers

"Remembering Alta California, Remaking the Past"

June 26-28, 2006


Joaquin Murrieta

California History–Social Science Content Standards

Fourth Grade

4.2 Students describe the social, political, cultural, and economic life and interactions among people of California from the pre-Columbian societies to the Spanish mission and Mexican rancho periods.

4.2.2 Identify the early land and sea routes to, and European settlements in, California with a focus on the exploration of the North Pacific (e.g., by Captain James Cook, Vitus Bering, Juan Cabrillo), noting especially the importance of mountains, deserts, ocean currents and wind patterns.

4.2.3 Describe the Spanish exploration and colonization of California , including the relationships among soldiers, missionaries, and Indians (e.g., Juan Crespi, Junipero Serra, Gaspar de Portola).

4.2.4 Describe the mapping of, geographic basis of, and economic factors in the placement and function of the Spanish missions; and understand how the mission system expanded the influence of Spain and Catholicism throughout New Spain and Latin America .

4.2.5 Describe the daily lives of the people, native and nonnative, who occupied the presidios, missions, ranchos, and pueblos.

4.2.6 Discuss the role of the Franciscans in changing the economy of California from a hunter-gatherer economy to an agricultural economy.

4.2.7 Describe the effects of the Mexican War for Independence on Alta California, including its effects on the territorial boundaries of North America.

4.2.8 Discuss the period of Mexican rule in California and its attributes, including land grants, secularization of the missions, and the rise of the rancho economy.


4.3 Students explain the economic, social, and political life in California from the establishment of the BearFlagRepublic through the Mexican-American War, the Gold Rush, and the granting of statehood.

4.3.1 Identify the locations of Mexican settlements in California and those of other settlements, including Fort Ross and Sutter’s Fort.

4.3.2 Compare how and why people traveled to California and the routes they traveled (e.g., James Beckwourth, John Bidwell, John C. Fremont, Pio Pico).

4.3.3 Analyze the effects of the Gold Rush on settlements, daily life, politics, and the physical environment (e.g. using biographies of John Sutter, Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo, Louise Clapp).

4.3.5 Discuss how California became a state and how its new government differed from those during the Spanish and Mexican periods.


4.4 Students explain how California became an agricultural and industrial power, tracing the transformation of the California economy and its political and cultural development since the 1850s.

4.4.2 Explain how the Gold Rush transformed the economy of California, including the types of products produced and consumed, changes in towns (e.g., Sacramento, San Francisco), and economic conflicts between diverse groups of people.

4.4.1 Understand the story and lasting influence of the Pony Express, Overland Mail Service, Western Union, and the building of the transcontinental railroad, including the contributions of Chinese workers to its construction.

4.4.4 Describe rapid American immigration, internal migration, settlement, and the growth of towns and cities (e.g., Los Angeles).


Eighth Grade

8.5 Students analyze U.S. foreign policy in the early Republic.

8.5.2 Know the changing boundaries of the United States and describe the relationship the country had with its neighbors (current Mexico and Canada) and Europe, including the influence of the Monroe Doctrine, and how those relationships influenced westward expansion and the Mexican-American War.

8.6 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced with emphasis on the Northeast.

8.6.1 Discuss the influence of industrialization and technological developments on the region, including human modification of the landscape and how physical geography shaped human actions (e.g. growth of cities, deforestation, farming, mineral extraction).

8.6.2 Outline the physical obstacles to and the economic and political factors involved in building a network of roads, canals, and railroads.

8.8 Students analyze the divergent paths of the American people in the West from 1800 to the mid-1800s and the challenges they faced.

8.8.2 Describe the purpose, challenges, and economic incentives associated with westward expansion, including the concept of Manifest Destiny and the territorial expansion that spanned numerous decades.

8.8.5 Discuss Mexican settlements and their locations, cultural traditions, attitudes toward slavery, land-grant system, and economies.

8.8.6 Describe the Texas War for Independence and the Mexican-American War, including the territorial settlements, the aftermath of the wars, and the effects the wars had on the lives of Americans, including Mexican Americans today.

8.9 Students analyze the early and steady attempts to abolish slavery and to realize the ideals of the Declaration of Independence.

8.9.4 Discuss the importance of the slavery issue as raised by the annexation of Texas and California’s admission to the union as a free state under the Compromise of 1850.

8.12 Students analyze the transformation of the American economy and the changing social and political conditions in the United States in response to the Industrial Revolution.

8.12.1 Trace patterns of agricultural and industrial development as they relate to climate, use of natural resources, markets, and trade and locate such developments on a map.

8.12.2 Identify the reasons for the development of federal Indian policy and the wars with American Indians and their relationship to agricultural development and industrialization.

8.12.4 Discuss entrepreneurs, industrialists, and bankers in politics, commerce, and industry (e.g., Andrew Carnegies, John D. Rockefeller, Leland Stanford).

8.12.5 Examine the location and effects of urbanization, renewed immigration, and industrialization (e.g., the effects on social fabric of cities, wealth and economic opportunity, the conservation movement).

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