Celery pickers in California's fields. Photo by danlong.
Celery pickers in California's fields. (Photo by danlong.)

2012 CLAS Summer Institute for Teachers
"Supply, Demand, and César Chávez"
Thursday, July 19, 2012

Relevant California Standards

Kindergarten

K.6 Students understand that history relates to events, people , and places of other times.

  1. Identify the purposes of, and the people and events honored in, commemorative holidays, including the human struggles that were the basis for the events (e.g., Thanksgiving, Independence Day, Washington’s and Lincoln’s Birthdays, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veteran’s Day).

First Grade

1.5 Students describe the human characteristics of familiar places and the varied backgrounds of American citizens and residents in those places.

1.5.2 Understand the ways in which American Indians and immigrants have helped define Californian and American culture.

Second Grade

2.5 Students understand the importance of individual action and character and explain how heroes from long ago and the recent past have made a difference in others’ lives (e.g., from biographies of Abraham Lincoln, Louis Pasteur, Sitting Bull, George Washington Carver, Marie Curie, Albert Einstein, Golda Meir, Jackie Robinson, Sally Ride).

Third Grade

3.3 Students draw from historical and community resources to organize the sequence of local historical events and describe how each period of settlement left its mark on the land.

3.3.1 Research the explorers who visited here, the newcomers who settled here, and the people who continue to come to the region, including their cultural and religious traditions and contributions.

3.3.2 Describe the economies established by settlers and their influence on the present-day economy, with emphasis on the importance of private property and entrepreneurship.

3.3.3 Trace why their community was established, how individuals and families contributed to its founding and development, and how the community has changed over time, drawing on maps, photographs, oral histories, letters, newspapers, and other primary sources.

3.4.6 Describe the lives of American heroes who took risks to secure our freedoms (e.g., Anne Hutchinson, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Tubman, Martin Luther King, Jr.).

Fourth Grade

4.4 Students explain how California became an agricultural and industrial power, tracing the transformation of the California economy and its political and cultural development since the 1850s.

4.4.6 Describe the development and locations of new industries since the turn of the century, such as the aerospace industry, electronics industry, large-scale commercial agriculture and irrigation projects, the oil and automobile industries, communications and defense industries, and important trade links with the Pacific Basin.

Grade Eleven

11.6.5 Trace the advances and retreats of organized labor, from the creation of the American Federation of Labor and the Congress of Industrial Organizations to current issues of a postindustrial, multinational economy, including the United Farm Workers in California.

11.8 Students analyze the economic boom and social transformation of post-World War II America.

11.8.2 Describe the significance of Mexican immigration and its relationship to the agricultural economy, especially in California.

11.9. Students analyze U.S. foreign policy since World War II.

11.9.7 Examine relations between the United States and Mexico in the twentieth century, including key economic, political, immigration, and environmental issues.

11.10 Students analyze the development of federal civil rights and voting rights.

11.10.5 Discuss the diffusion of the civil rights movement of African Americans from the churches of the rural South and the urban North, including the resistance to racial desegregation in Little Rock and Birmingham, and how the advances influenced the agendas, strategies, and effectiveness of the quests of American Indians, Asian Americans, and Hispanic Americans for civil rights and equal opportunities.

11.11 Students analyze the major social problems and domestic policy issues in contemporary American society.

11.11.1 Discuss the reasons for the nation’s changing immigration policy, with emphasis on how the Immigration Act of 1965 and successor acts have transformed American society.

11.11.7  Explain how the federal, state, and local governments have responded to demographic and social changes such as population shifts to the suburbs, racial concentration in the cities, Frostbelt-to-Sunbelt migration, international migration, decline of family farms, increases in out-of-wedlock births, and drug abuse.

Grade Twelve

12.4 Students analyze  the elements of the U.S. labor market in a global setting.

12.4.3 Discuss the wage differences among jobs and professions, using the laws of demand and supply and the concept of productivity.

12.4.4 Explain the effects of international mobility of capital and labor in the U.S. economy.

12.6 Students analyze the issues of international trade and explain how the U.S. economy affects, and is affected by, economic forces beyond the United States’s borders.

12.6.1 Identify the gains in consumption and production efficiency from trade, with emphasis on the main products and changing geographic patterns of twentieth-century trade among countries in the Western Hemisphere.

12.6.2 Compare the reasons for and the effects of trade restrictions during the Great Depression compared with present-day arguments among labor, business, and political leaders over the effects of free trade on the economic and social interests of various groups of Americans.

Other Outreach Events

2011 Summer Institute for Teachers

"Remembering the Mexican-American War"

2010 Summer Institute for Teachers

"Six Degrees of Diego Rivera"

2009 Summer Institute for Teachers

"The Octopus and the Banana: United Fruit in Latin America"

2008 Summer Institute for Teachers

"Empire to Empire: The Americas in the Age of Exploration"

2007 Summer Institute for Teachers

"From Crude to Cane: Energy Policy in Latin America"

2006 Summer Institute for Teachers

"Remembering Alta California, Remaking the Past "

2004 Summer Institute for Teachers

"The Making of Modern Cuba"

2003 Summer Institute for Teachers

"Ten Years After NAFTA: How Has Globalization Affected Mexico?"

2002 Summer Institute for Teachers

"Mexico in the 20th Century:
Themes of the History Curriculum
"

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
© 2012, The Regents of the University of California, Last Updated - June 1, 2012