I would soon learn that Stan had organized workers into unions in the 1930s and 1940s, on occasion being chased or beaten for his efforts, and I would see him stand proudly with labor throughout his life; I would see Stan champion human rights throughout the world whether in Russia or Chile; I would see his support of women in his life and in his company far ahead of the curve; and I would witness him oppose unjust wars guided by a moral compass whatever the personal cost.

In the weeks and months after we met a friendship bloomed. I would meet Stan and Iris after school in the storefront offices on Six Mile Road of a company they had just founded. At the time, the company had an oscilloscope or two and was about to hire its first employee. It's name and its mission would prove prophetic: Energy Conversion Laboratories. What a name to choose in 1960!

In Stan's office, there was a periodic table of the elements on the wall and shelves of books from Albert Einstein to the Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, from the British philosopher Bertrand Russell to the American labor leader A. Philip Randolph.

1946 - Stan (3rd from left) and his crew in the original barn at Exchange Auto Parts with his newly invented Benjamin Automatic. ~ This photograph is from the personal collection of family treasures kept by Barney's wife, Frances Baranoff (now Friedman).

1946 - Stan (3rd from left) and his crew in the original barn at Exchange Auto Parts with his newly invented Benjamin Automatic. ~ This photograph is from the personal collection of family treasures kept by Barney's wife, Frances Baranoff (now Friedman).